I love how much they love this

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We put up the Christmas tree last weekend. It was such a great weekend. We didn’t go ANYWHERE. We did NO SHOPPING. We just stayed at home. We didn’t even make a turkey for Thanksgiving Day, just a roasted chicken because it was the four of us. Though I did make little mini-apple pies, that was fun.

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Every year gets better and better with kids, I tell you. They are more fun, more verbal (though being more opinionated goes right along with that). Their excitement over putting up the Christmas decorations was amazing this year. We put on the Christmas carols, some Herb Alpert (this version of Winter Wonderland is my all-time favorite, by the way. YOU’RE WELCOME!), and they went crazy.

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They don’t seem to able to both smile in the same picture yet though. That will be nice someday.

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Posted in at home
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Hey Seattle!

I’m going to be in the Seattle area next week and I’m excited to announce that I’ll be at Dry Goods Design in Ballard on Thursday evening, December 6th, to help celebrate the opening of their new make*do*mend studio space. A sewing studio full of Berninas??? Awesome!!

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Here’s a blurb from Dry Goods: “December 6, 2012 – Open Studio Night with special guest Rae Hoekstra of made-by-rae.com and creator of the famed Washi Dress Pattern. Join us for our first studio night in the new make*do*mend at Drygoods Design space! Rae will be speaking to sewing clothing, tips and tricks on the Washi Dress, fun variations and more. You will also get the first look at the new space, test drive our fleet of Bernina sewing machines, and check out our new selection of notions, supplies and crafting fun. Attendees will save 10% on the Washi Dress Pattern as well. We’ll provide the space and machines and some snacks, you bring yourself! *Special waiver of the $10 reservation for studio night for this date.

I’ll bring along my closet of Washi Dresses and give a short presentation on sewing garments and maybe even do a demo or two of some garment-sewing techniques. There will be machines so bring something along to sew or bind or work on, or just bring your amazing self and hang out and chat. I also heard there might be snacks. It’s going to be really fun!

If you haven’t checked out Dry Goods Design online shop yet you really should — Keli has a great eye for selecting fabrics and has a nicely-curated collection of modern prints. The website is really fun to look around!

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Dry Goods Design is located in Ballard. The address is: 5308 Ballard Avenue NW, Studio One, Seattle, 98107. Please reserve your spot by going to the event page and clicking on the “Join” button to let Keli know you’re coming!

Hope you can make it!!!

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B-Side Metalworks Giveaway [NOW CLOSED]

Thanks for entering! A winner will be announced/contacted shortly.

images courtesy of B-side Metalworks

OK, so before we talk about the giveaway, I have to show you my sewing machine charm. Love it. I was so excited when my friend-in-real-life Christy (and, also: blog sponsor) asked if I was interested in collaborating with her on a sewing-related jewelry design for her shop B-side Metalworks. Yes please! I drew up a few sewing machine designs and this one ended being my favorite, so Christy turned it into a sweet little charm (they’re available in her shop now as well).

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I seriously wear this thing all. the. time. It’s super high quality but still casual enough to wear every day. Perfect combination. The little sewing machine is cut out entirely by hand which I find totally amazing. I also bought two extra initial charms that say “C” and “E” that I wear along with the sewing machine charm. I love wearing little symbols of my “loves” around my neck (though I still need to get Mr Rae’s initial. Ahem. Will work on that. hee oops. Love you babe!!!).

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My other favorite purchase from Christy has been these fallen leaves hoops, which I wore in this post. I like that they’re not too fancy for every day and they instantly kick it up a notch when I wear them. Hot-cha-cha.

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and I love my copper hoops, too, you can see a peek at those in the original Washi Dress post if you look carefully. It’s like Where’s Waldo, with jewelry.

Anyway, I’m thrilled to have B-side Metalworks as a sponsor and so happy to be able to give away a $50 gift card to the shop today! Every piece that Christy makes is completely hand-made, from cutting out and soldering the frames onto her circular charms, to hand-sawing the highly-intricate sewing machine shape. She hand-stamps all letters and names for custom orders, and shapes like the leaves are all hand cut and shaped. The result is one-of-a-kind pieces that are more beautiful and valuable than your run-of-the-mill stamped jewelry. Some more pretty things from her shop:

All found in the B-Side Metalworks shop

Today Christy is giving away a $50 gift card to her shop to one lucky winner, as well as 10% off for one week to everyone!

To enter to win a $50 gift card to the B-side Metalworks shop, leave ONE comment on this post before it closes on Thursday at 9 pm Eastern. I’ll choose a random winner and contact via email. You must be 18 or older to enter. Void where prohibited by law.

You can use the gift code MadeByRae10off in the B-side shop and get 10% off anytime between today and next Tuesday, December 4th, 2012. Just enter the code in the coupon code section at checkout (click on “apply shop coupon code” and then the coupon box will appear). Don’t forget, because it’s good for just one week!

Best of Quilt Market: Anna Maria Horner

Never fond of finishing what I start before the next thing, I pooped out before I had a chance to write all of the “Best of Quilt Market” posts that I wanted to…but I can’t stop thinking about a few other cool things that were at Quilt Market that must see the Light of Blog. Anna Maria’s booth was one of them!

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You already know I love Anna Maria Horner’s fabric designs (hello shower curtain?? And to the two or three ladies who keep emailing me repeatedly to ask if I will sell it, I’m very sorry but it’s not for sale). Her latest line, Field Study, is currently vying for the award of “favorite AMH fabric line” in my heart (with Good Folks, of course. Both lines can be viewed in AMH’s product gallery). I also really fell for this booth because, as someone who loves to sew garments, I’m super happy about the coming-soon Field study voiles and rayons that will work great for sewing garments. See these lovelies? They are the most wonderfully drapey RAYONS. Perfect for skirts, dresses, blouses. YAY! I am giddy with excitement. When. will. they. be. here. ???

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The other fabric I get really excited about is velveteen, and the Field Study velveteens are really, really great. Check out these awesome pillows, with TASSELS. I know. Those are going to take a big chunk out of my fabric budget this year. Oy.

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I also really enjoyed the peek at her embroidery designs from her new hand-sewing book, Anna Maria’s Needleworks Notebook. Really love the pink wall too. I wish I had the guts to paint a room in that color.

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More of my Fall 2012 Quilt Market posts:

Kokka faves
Melody Miller
Carolyn Friedlander
Ty Pennington hilarity

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Washi Dress Sewing Pattern is now in print!

I am like a proud mother hen, y’all.

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I can’t take much of the credit though; Elli reformatted the original digital layout for print, Lauren designed the cover, and Jessica did just about everything else required to ship these out to all the shops that wanted them: taking orders, emailing shops, sending invoices, and so on. I made Jessica put “Director of Print Operations” on her email signature. Ostentatious titles amuse me.

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There are two full-sized one-sided pattern sheets, so you can either trace or GASP! cut your pieces out (I never cut into my pattern pages — see this post for an overview of my sewing process — but you do what you have to do).

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The instructions are also on one big sheet (don’t they look awesome, by the way? That’s Elli, my Digitizing Queen). This was a selfish decision, really; when I sew I like to have everything out there, where I can see it, instead of having to flip through pages in a booklet. Just my personal preference. You want to know my trick? Instead of laying it out on the table where it gets in the way, I hang the whole page up on the sewing room wall with a few pieces of washi tape, like this! Handy.

washi instructions on wall

If you would like to own your very own copy of this limited-edition print pattern, click here to see a list of the shops who have it in stock:

We are also still taking wholesale orders from brick and mortar shops and webstores who are interested in carrying the pattern, so email Jessica if your shop is interested in carrying these.

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The Princess and the Pea Dress

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First can I just say, the Gulf of Mexico at sunset is quite possibly the best backdrop for photos that I have ever had. These pics are all unedited (save a couple of crops), taken with a cheap 50 mm lens, no tricks, so fun. Snapping pictures of my daughter playing happily on the beach in something cute I made her in less than a half hour THAT SHE WILL WEAR WITHOUT A TANTRUM = heavenly.

Second. I have owned this Heather Ross Far Far Away Double gauze for more than three years, but it wasn’t until I chopped a bunch of it up for a rainbow quilt that I felt really liberated to really dig into it. A quilt for Clementine was always the first thing I meant to do with it, but now there are plenty of other big chunks of the rest of the collection that I can see already will make divine little outfits for the girl. Fun!

Third. This Florida vacation has not been quite as idyllic as it looks in these pictures and in my Instagram pics. Mr Rae, his parents, Elliot, and I all spent the earlier half of this week suffering from a ridiculously contagious stomach flu that now everyone on this trip except Clementine has had (we’re in Florida this week on an annual vacation with Mr Rae’s entire family. We’ve done this now for four years in a row instead of exchanging gifts for Christmas). My sister-in-law now has something resembling strep. Ack. I don’t think I want to do this again. All that to say, family vacations can be a mixed bag, right?

The Apple Doesn’t Fall Far From The Tree Shorts

OK, so it’s a long name, but it’s fitting: You take a bunch of shirts or boxers from dad’s closet and chop them up, then put them back together to make a great pair kid shorts. I should have posted this eons ago, but honestly I just plain forgot about it *facepalm*. Sometimes that just happens around here. You know what made me think of it? The fact that he’s wearing them, today, in Florida (we’re here on our annual family vacay). He loves these shorts, mostly because everything in them used to be his daddy’s. Plus they’re supercomfy. Double yay.

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This tutorial was previously published as part of the Fall 2012 Issue of Petit Purls, a great online kids’ knitting mag (this was their Sewing Issue) and it’s still fall, so in a sense it isn’t late at all. But in the sense that it’s just now starting to snow in the Midwest, maybe not so much. Ack. Oh well, perfect timing for those of you in Australia, who are just now starting your summer sewing, right? By the way, that will never not be weird to me.

I should also point out that if you followed the tutorial but used a pair of pants for your pattern instead, you could make a seriously cute pair of pants for winter!! Flannel plaids would be SO GREAT for this pattern. One last thought: if you’re cleaning out the husbeast’s summer clothes drawer to make room for sweaters now, start saving a few shirts for a pair of shorts next spring. OK, I’m finished trying to convince you that you need this now. If it’s snowing by you, save it for later.

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So the tutorial consists of three parts (SCROLL DOOOWN FOR THE FULL TUTORIAL!). First you trace a pattern (you could do this with shorts or pants):

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And then you make the “fabric:”

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Then you turn them into cute shorts! (or pants!)

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Did you catch the incorporation of shirt-pockets to shorts-pockets? Clever, eh?? Can I get an Upcycling high-five?

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And of course, you could use the basic instructions with any fabric, even if it’s not pieced. I think you’ll find this tutorial to be really useful!!

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Here’s the full tutorial, as it previously appeared on Petit Purls:

This snazzy pair of shorts is a great way to reuse old grown-up shirts or boxer shorts! We always have a pile at our house that my husband has tossed aside for various reasons, and I save them when I like the print and the fabric is still in good shape. You could also pick up a pile of shirts at the thrift store or use new fabric if you like (just remember to pre-wash and dry your fabric if you do this). This tutorial shows you how to reuse the finished edges of the older garment as hems for the shorts, making them a nice quick project. Your boy will enjoy knowing that his new pair of shorts came “from daddy’s shirts!”


PatternSIZE
Any size, made to size.

MATERIALS
men’s shirts or boxers (I used four old shirts and two pairs of boxers)

1” wide elastic

Tools and notions
clear quilter’s ruler, rotary cutter, and mat
sewing machine with size 14/90 ruler
matching thread
white butcher paper or large-sheet packing paper
marker
seam ripper
safety pin

PATTERN NOTES
This tutorial shows you how to make a basic 1-piece shorts pattern from an existing garment, and then shows you how to construct the shorts. You could use the same techniques to make a really great pair of PANTS too!


INSTRUCTIONS

Make your pattern
First we’re going to make a simple shorts pattern that will allow you to make a great pair of shorts with just one pattern piece! I think you’ll find that you can also use it for more than just this tutorial — I’ve found mine to be incredibly versatile and since it’s based on a pair of shorts that already fit, there’s no guessing on the size you need!

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Step 1: Find a pair of shorts
Find a pair of shorts that fit your child. The shorts should have elastic either halfway or all the way around the waist. Flat-front shorts with elastic in the back are fine.

Step 2: Trace the back of the shorts
Fold the shorts in half down the center so that the back side of the shorts is facing out. Place the shorts on a large piece of butcher or packing paper, and overlap the halves of the shorts as evenly as possible, lining up edges carefully and flattening the shorts as best you can. Take a marker and trace as closely around the bottom, center, and top edge of the shorts as possible, stretching out the elastic as much as you can to get the true shape of the shorts along the top. Make marks at the side so you’ll know where to place the shorts on the paper when you trace the other side.

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Step 3: Trace the front of the shorts
Now fold the shorts down the center so that the front side is facing out. Line the sides of the shorts up with the marks you just made. Repeat the tracing steps for the back.

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Step 4: Check that the pattern is wide enough at the waist
Before we move on, we’re going to do a little size-check. Measure across the top of the shorts, double that number, and make sure that it’s at least 2” bigger than the hip measurement of your child (measure with a flexible measuring tape around the widest part of their bum). If the waist width is too close to their hip measurement, it’s going to be a squeeze to pull it on, so if it’s too small, draw the pattern wider at the center front or center back until it’s large enough.

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Example (above): I measured the waist edge on the pattern to be about 13” wide, so the finished shorts will measure twice that, or 26” around the waist before the elastic goes in. Since my son’s hip measurement is 24,” there will be 2” of extra room.

Step 5: Make sure the inseam is the same length on both front and back
The shorts have to match up along the inside of the leg (inseam), so measure that distance on both sides and make sure it’s the same. If it’s not, lengthen one of the sides to match the length of the other.

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When you’re finished you should have something similar to the outline below. The taller side is the back of the shorts.

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Step 6: Add seam allowances to the pattern
Take your ruler and add ½” around the outside of the center and inseam edges of the pattern. Add 1 1/2” to the top for the waistband casing.

Note: You won’t need to add a hem allowance to the bottom edge of the pattern since we’ll be using the finished edges from the shirts for the hem. If you want to use this pattern to make additional pairs of shorts or you are using new fabric for this tutorial, you should add a 1” hem allowance to the bottom of the pattern.

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Make your “fabric”
Now it’s time to chop up those old shirts and boxers and piece them together to make the fabric for the shorts.

Step 1: Cut your old garments into 4” strips
Cut your garments along side seams, press them flat, and use a rotary cutter, mat and ruler to cut them into 4” strips that are as long as the pattern is wide. For the top and bottom of the shorts, they can be a little shorter because the pattern piece is narrower at the waist and leg.

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Hints:
– For my shorts (about size 5 / 6), I needed six strips for each side of the shorts, 12 strips total.
– Use existing hems whenever possible
– Cut a couple strips from the button plackets of a shirt and use a seam ripper to take off the buttons (below left). These finished edges can become the bottom hem of your shorts.
– Save a couple of shirt pockets by cutting ½” around the outside of each pocket (below right). You can use these as pockets for your shorts if you like.
– As you cut the strips, line them up over your pattern piece to see how many strips you’ll need total. Keep in mind that the strips will lose ½” on each side for seams.

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Step 2: Sew the 4” strips together

Here is a quick overview of how all of the seams on the shorts were sewn, both when piecing the strips to make the fabric AND when sewing the shorts together:

– Sew the long edges of the two strips together with a ½” seam (a).
– Press the seam to one side (b).
– Zig-zag stitch over the raw seam edges to tack them down and so that they won’t fray (c). This will make all of your seams extra strong. You will be able to see the zig-zag stitch through the fabric, which adds a nice effect (d).

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Now sew enough strips together to cover the entire pattern piece (I sewed my strips WRONG sides together for this part):

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Then press the seam allowances down and zig-zag stitch over the raw edges:

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Repeat for the other leg of the shorts.

Construct the shorts

Step 1: Cut out your fabric
Place your pattern piece over the shorts and cut out the fabric. The rulers in the photo below were used to hold the pattern piece flat.

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Flip the pattern piece over and repeat for the other side of the shorts. VERY IMPORTANT: Your two shorts panels must be mirror images so check carefully before cutting into your fabric!

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Step 2: Attach the pockets (optional)
Press the edges of the pocket pieces under towards the wrong side.

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Pin each pocket to the center of each of the shorts panels, and sew carefully around the edges to attach. BE CAREFUL not to sew the pocket shut when you sew across the top edge!

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Step 3: Sew the center seams together
Place your two shorts panels with right sides facing, and sew the center seams together with a ½” seam allowance.

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Recommended: Trim seam allowances to ¼”, press to one side, and zig-zag the raw edges down to make this seam extra-strong.

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Step 4: Sew the inseam
Open up your shorts and line up the inseam edges with right sides together. Sew with a ½” seam.

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Recommended: Trim the seam allowance to ¼”, press to one side, and zig-zag the raw edges down to make this seam extra strong.

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Step 5: Make waistband casing
Fold ¼” along top edge of shorts toward wrong side and press. Fold over an additional 1 ¼” and press down. This will become the waistband casing.

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Starting at the back center seam, sew along the lower folded edge of the waistband casing, being careful to leave a 2” hole at the back to insert the elastic. I sewed a little piece of ribbon under the casing at the back to help my son tell front from back.

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Take a piece of 1” wide elastic and cut it 1” shorter than your child’s waist measurement. Thread it through the casing using a safety pin. Overlap the ends by at least one inch, and zig-zag stitch back and forth a few times across the ends to secure them.

Hint: Cut the elastic a couple inches longer than needed (as shown below) and overlap the ends by 2” instead of 1” so that you can let out the waist as your child grows.

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Now sew the waistband casing opening shut along the folded edge, and you’re finished!

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This blog is proudly sponsored by

Fitting It All In

It’s been awhile since I talked your ear off, so guess what? You’re in for a bit of blahdeeblahdeeblah today! Yay!!

I am embarrassed to admit how many times I’ve written and then deleted this post. It’s hard to write about your life without sounding really cheesy, and mostly I would think to myself, “why write about life and blogging and balance when it’s been written about SO many times before?” Then I realized, duh, you probably wouldn’t be reading this blog if you didn’t care about what I have to say in some small way, so why not give it a try? I want to talk a little first about how blogging turned into sort of a job for me, and then how on earth I fit everything Blog-related into my Real Life without going insane. An interesting topic, no? And I think, really important, because I want to be the best wife to Mr Rae and mama to these little munchkins that I can possibly be.

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This blog began humbly, like most other blogs, with no huge aspirations but more as a hobby to keep myself from stabbing my eye out with a pencil after hour upon hour watching baby Elliot drool and try to roll over. I really truly wish it hadn’t been the case, but after being a full-time high school science teacher, the extremely slow pace of motherhood bored me to tears and made me feel a bit depressed and aimless. I needed a project. And friends. Besides the baby. So I started blogging about my sewing projects. Sound familiar? I feel like this is a story that so many of us share!

Once I started posting things on my blog on a regular basis, more people began visiting and commenting (the blog was then hosted at madebyrae.blogspot.com) and it felt very exciting. I posted a free marker-drawn baby dress pattern and things really picked up. I started selling a few digital patterns, first on Etsy, and then through instant download directly from my blog. I contributed to One Yard Wonders. I ran my first Spring Top Sewalong. By this time Elliot was nearly two and I was pregnant with Clementine. The blog began demanding more of me but it was fairly manageable during naps and after Elliot went to bed, maybe the occcasional put-the-kid-in-front-of-Charlie-and-Lola to finish things up. It wasn’t until after Clementine was born and began napping at different times than Elliot that I began to feel a bit frustrated by my inability to keep up with the work of blogging. It wasn’t just writing blog posts, it was answering emails, trouble-shooting pattern download issues, and participating in blogger events, and on, and on…

It was at this point that Mr Rae and I realized that if I was going to continue blogging and designing patterns (I wish there was ONE word for what exactly I do), that we would have to put Elliot into preschool and get a babysitter for Clementine. That was a really hard decision. E was barely three and C wasn’t even crawling yet, and I felt immense guilt over wanting to have them out of the house for a bit each week, but I really loved doing this blog/pattern thing. Plus the money I was making from pattern sales wasn’t really all that much, so it was a bit of a leap of faith to decide that if I could spend a little uninterrupted time without the kids a couple mornings a week, maybe I could make enough income selling more patterns to justify it. That turned out to be true, and it’s worked out that way ever since. I love that I can “work” a few days a week but still be at home with my kids too. I really really love sewing, designing, blogging, and I feel like the problem-solving-science-teacher part of my brain is happy with all of the logistics involved producing sewing patterns. It’s really wonderful.

When it comes to actually scheduling the Blog into my Real Life, time-wise, I’ve tried a few of approaches. First, there was what I like to call the “Multitasking Approach.” This was when the babies were both small (under 2 1/2) and it mainly consisted of “working” (blogging, emailing, designing patterns, sewing) whenever the kids were asleep or playing. So after bedtime and during naps. Sometimes during a TV show. The problem is, a nap never ends when you want it to. There’s always one more thing to do, another email to write, and soon enough you have toddlers tugging on your pant leg and screaming whenever they see the laptop open. I really started to hate how much Elliot expected TV to be a regular part of his day.

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(OK, so we let them have “screen time” every day (tablet apps, games), but very little TV, which I’m more comfortable with)

When we decided the kids would have a babysitter/daycare/preschool, it was like breathing a sigh of relief. No more trying to multitask. Now I really try to stick to the “Divide-and-Separate Approach,” in other words, trying as much as possible to separate the time I spend “working” from the time I spend with my kids and Mr Rae. I’ve tried to do this as much as possible, by having the kids with a babysitter or in daycare/preschool for at least 2-3 days a week for the last couple of years so that I can really focus on sewing or blogging or whatever, and that has worked pretty well for me. In reality, kids get sick, babysitters cancel, school is closed for holidays, so it’s not always a perfect system. But that’s life. I find that if I at least know that I have another block of work time coming up soon, I don’t get as frustrated if I have to set aside a creative project to play Ring-Around-The-Rosie or Chutes and Ladders (gah! that game drives me bezonk!).

Another key part to the “Divide-and-Separate” approach for me has been a strict “When-the-kids-are-in-the-room-the-laptop-is-closed” rule for myself. It’s just too easy to ignore them when that screen is open. I try to only ever be on my computer or sew when they are out of the house or after they are asleep at night. Just shutting it off is really good for me.

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Finally, I just want to say a little bit about saying NO. One of the things I really hate is having to email someone to turn them down when they ask me to participate in a project. But I do it, alot. In fact, I feel like it’s almost every day. But I have another rule for myself that I call “Say Yes to ONE” that means that I only ever allow myself to take on one outside project a month. So if there’s a book tour going around, or a costume series, or someone wants me to contribute to a publication, I usually say no. And yes, it sucks. I worry that people think I don’t want to be a part of it. There is SO much fun stuff to participate in. But I find (big surprise) that the more things I say yes too, the more flustered, disorganized, and overwhelmed I feel, and that can be paralyzing to me when it comes to working efficiently on the things I want to do and enjoying the time I do spend with the kids and Mr Rae.

I’ve also realized that it’s totally worth it to pay other people to do a bunch of my work for me so that I can spend less time working. My sister Elli does a ton of work on my digital sewing pattern layouts and digitizes the pattern pieces, my cousin Jessica has been running the Printed Washi Pattern Project (shipping Friday to a shop near you!!) for me for the past couple months and assisting in other ways, and Lauren and Karen have helped me out with various projects in various ways, just to name a few people who pitch in around here. And yes, that means I spend bunches of dollars paying people every month but it’s so worth it for me not to have to try and do everything myself.

I really hope this post hasn’t given anyone the impression that I’m only blogging to make money or that I want to “make it big” because the truth is, the blog itself makes very little money, definitely not enough to pay myself in any reasonable way for all of the time I have spent here over the past five years, growing and tending it. But selling my sewing patterns HAS turned into a business and I try to accept the reality of that and hope that I can still keep the blog real even if things get commercially every once in awhile (*cough* shameless Washi Dress promotion *cough*).

I don’t want a big business or the stress that goes with it. I love the semi-small thing I have worked out now, and I really love the community of people that I have been able to get to know through this blog and ultimately my goal is to be able to keep sewing and blogging about things that I love. The sewing patterns are a natural way to make money doing what I love, and I’m really thankful that I can make enough selling sewing patterns to support my family (Mr Rae’s been working on getting a start-up off the ground for the last couple of years, so yup, right now, it’s pretty much just me, income-wise). That is immensely gratifying from a professional standpoint and I only have you, dear readers and friends to thank for all of your unrelenting encouragement and support. Anyway, blahdeeblahdeeblah CHEESY! BWAAAAH. See I barfed all over it to make it better.

Signing off now,
Rae

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Project Peeks

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I had a truly wonderful weekend, mostly due to the fact that we didn’t go anywhere. I’d been out of town two weekends in a row and sometimes you just want to stay home, you know? Do laundry, clean the bathrooms, make the rest of the house look semi-clean. I even found a little time to start on some new projects. A rainbow quilt for Clementine (above), a doll quilt for her doll with some of the scraps (below), and those colorful pom-poms. I love pom-poms so much, don’t you? I cranked out that little pile while Mr Rae and I watched a movie Saturday night. Not sure exactly what they will turn into yet, but I do know that Christmas is coming!!!

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