The boy, a hat, and his Cthulhu

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Couldn’t resist a little CTB encore today with pictures of the new Tic Tac Toe shirt in action.

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Bonus points to you if you even know who Cthulhu is (it’s pronounced “ka-thoo-loo”). Our little Cthulhu enjoys current status as the most loved of all of Elliot’s “guys,” which is what he calls the entourage of stuffed animals (this includes Kermit) that inhabit his bed. It may seem like an odd choice for a stuffed animal, but Mr Rae and I thought it was completely hilarious when Elliot used to put a bowl in front of Cthulhu at the dinner table and tell us, with his slight little lisp, that Cthulhu was eating “the souls of his followers” (“the soulth of hith followerth”), a concept he was far too young to comprehend. I’m pretty sure his grandmother found this a bit horrifying.

kthulu in the hat

Celebrate the BOY Wrapup!

This round of Celebrate the BOY has been phenomenally fun! I’ve had a great time sharing this series of posts with you, and getting the chance to collaborate with the ever-talented and amazing Dana over at MADE is always a wonderful experience!!! I hope you’ve enjoyed following along and sewing for your own boys! You’ve posted your projects in our Celebrate the BOY flickr group, and that’s been really cool to watch; so many cool projects and ideas in that group. Feel free to keep adding your projects throughout the year. I love checking in to see what everyone is making!

Here’s a quick look at the clothes I made this year for Elliot:

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Seeing everything I made for this series all together in one place is v. satisfying. Just so you know, I didn’t sew and photograph all of this stuff just in the last two weeks (that would be insane!). I worked on most of these in January and early February so that I would have time to blog about them during Celebrate the BOY. I even started planning a little in December, picking out fabrics and such. It’s so fun to plot and plan with Dana and decide how and when things will run (even if I *say* I want to just post every other day but then inevitably end up posting daily. Oops! It helps that Dana is a fellow overachiever…YAY!).

Here are the links to each individual post:

Saffron pantsshow your stripes turtleneckTuxedo Stripe pantCity Pantlittle bit of color hoodieFox TeeCelebration Garlandkneepads 3 waystic tac toeLittle Bit of Color Hoodie Tutorial

And a look at all of our fun roundups (most based on my “Rules” when it comes to sewing for boys):

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color primariesmosaica88a950a51ea1043fdcbfa3d63358733b579e0b6

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autos mosaic 2pants & piping mosaic 1

And don’t forget the fun mustache roundup! You can see all of the Celebrate the BOY posts, past and present, in the archives. You can find MADE’s boy archives right here.

I’d like to give special thanks to the following sponsors: Fashionable Fabrics, Pink Chalk Fabrics, Fabricworm, Pink Castle Fabrics, The Fabric Fairy, Blank Slate Patterns and Wunderpop. Thank you for supplying prizes for our Celebrate the BOY weekend giveaways!

Thanks to all of you, my awesome readers, for your wonderful comments and encouragement. I hope you had fun sewing and following along with Celebrate the BOY 2013!

Kneepads – 3 Ways!

We’re wrapping up Celebrate the BOY this week, but I have just one more how-to post I wanted to share. Today I thought I’d talk a bit about adding kneepads to pants. You can add kneepads while you’re making pants OR after they have been worn through at the knees. All three of these kneepads have been tested by Elliot, and each one has proven to hold up over time. Kids can be rough on their clothes, and kneepads are a great way to ensure that your hard-earned sewing efforts don’t go to waste!

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The first kneepad goes across the pant leg and is made of a basic rectangle.

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In this tutorial I’m showing you how to add the kneepad to a four-piece pant (see this post for the difference between a four-piece and two-piece pant), but you can also use it for a two-piece pant pattern, as long as you finish one of the sides before attaching it to the pant leg. I’ll discuss that below.

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(1) Cut two rectangles of fabric, at least one inch wider than the width of the pant leg. The height should be twice the height that you want your kneepad PLUS 1″ for seam allowance (so if you want a 5″ kneepad, cut them (5×2)+1=11″ tall). Add fusible interfacing if your fabric is not a bottom-weight like twill, canvas, or corduroy. In the picture, the rectangles are folded in half.
(2) Fold each rectangle in half like a hot dog with right sides together so that the bottom and top edges are even. Pin and sew the two edges together with a 1/2″ seam.
(3) Turn the kneepad right-side out and press it flat. Use another pair of pants to help you find where your child’s knee will hit on the pant, making sure to fold over the waistband allowance on the pants-in-progress for more accurate placement.
(4) Mark your stitch lines across the kneepad using chalk and a ruler, roughly 1″ apart. Pin each kneepad in place to each front pant piece.
(5) Stitch along the lines to secure the kneepad to the pant leg.
(6) Trim the edges of the kneepads even with the edges of the pant pieces.
(7) Finish sewing the pant together. The outside edges of the kneepads will get sewn into the outseams (shown) and the inseams (not shown) of the pant.

If you are using a two-piece pant pattern, you have two options: you can either sew one of the side edges together in step 2 before turning it right-side out so it’s finished (the other side edge gets finished when sewing the inseam), or you can tuck the outside edge of the kneepad under a tuxedo stripe as shown here:

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(See this post for a tuxedo stripe tutorial.)

You can see this kneepad in action on Elliot’s Tuxedo Stripe Pants! Here’s another shot of him last fall wearing the linen pants made in the tutorial. They’re really soft because they’re made out of Essex Linen, a soft but sturdy fabric that’s become really popular lately, so this pair has been one of his favorites. Can you believe how long his hair was in this picture?

kneepad pants up north

Here’s a how-to for a more “classic”-shape kneepad:

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(1) Cut two front and two back pieces (I like to use a contrast color that will peek out a little behind the kneepad).
(2) If your fabric is not very heavy, you may want to add fusible interfacing to strengthen it.
(3) Pin each kneepad front to each back, right sides facing, and sew all the way around, leaving an opening for turning. Then turn it right-side out through the opening, and press it flat.
(4) Pin and sew to pant leg (preferably before you sew the pant inseam, ahem. It can be a bit difficult to sew it onto the pant leg after it’s already been sewn together).

You can see this kneepad in action on Elliot’s City Pant! If you like this look, you should also check out Dana’s Kid Pants with Kneepads for another great way to make kneepads (from t-shirt scraps).

The third type of kneepad is a patch kneepad. I’ve used Elliot’s favorite Melody Miller radio print on two different pairs of jeans to patch holes at the knees. The print comes on a Kokka linen canvas, which is nice and heavy, but you could use a scrap from another pair of pants or any canvas fabric, as long as it’s fairly heavy-duty.

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(1) The pair of jeans I started with had holes worn through the knees.
(2) Use an iron to fuse a scrap of canvas to double-sided fusible web (like HeatnBond), and cut to size.
(3) Peel the backing off.
(4) Place kneepads in desired location.
(5) Press with an iron to fuse them to the jeans.
(6) If your machine arm will fit inside the leg of the pant with room to maneuver, you can zig-zag stitch around the edges of the kneepad to hold it in place. It might be easier, though, to whipstitch over the edges by hand, using a heavier thread like Coats & Clark buttonhole thread or topstitch thread.
(7) My stitches didn’t end up looking too hot…you might want to try a thread that matches better (that didn’t stop Mr E from wearing them until the jeans got too small, though)!
(8) Repeat for the other leg.

So, there you go: three different ways to make kneepads…three different ways to make pants last longer!

Celebrate the BOY 2013

This post is part of Celebrate the BOY, a series of boy sewing posts hosted by me and Dana of MADE. Check out my Celebrate the BOY archives for more boy sewing posts.  Here’s what we’ve done so far:

DAY 1: Rae: Saffron Pants and Color Roundup / Dana: 5 Steps to the Basic Tee
DAY 2: Rae: Little Bit of Color Hoodie / Dana: Pants Roundup
DAY 3: Rae: Hoodie Tutorial / Dana: Kids Shorts/Pants with Back Pocket Tutorial
DAY 4: Rae: Show your Stripes Turtleneck / Dana: 13 DIY Fabrics
DAY 5: Rae: Stripes Roundup and Celebration Garland / Dana: Favorite Tee Shirt Buddy Toys
DAY 6: Rae: Fox Tee / Dana: Big Stick Jammies
DAY 7: Rae: Bold Prints Roundup / Dana: Beach Robe to House Robe Remix
DAY 8: Rae: City Pants / Dana: we be jammin PJ roundup
DAY 9: Rae: Mustache Roundup / Dana: Stripes, Checks, and Piping, oh my
Day 10: Rae: Piping Roundup / Dana: some like it Chewie, some like it Hoth (heee!!!)
Day 11: Dana: Muscle Tees

Piping improves everything.

I mentioned my love of piping yesterday, but I think it’s worth revisiting. I love the way piping instantly makes something more snazzy and profesh, like the little collared shirt for Elliot that I posted yesterday. I’ve used piping on little backpacks, pants, on my own clothing, and on purses. In fact, I think I will boldly say that I have NEVER seen a sewn item that piping did not improve. Which brings me to my fourth (and final, at least for this round of CTB) rule when it comes to sewing for boys:

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Piping has been popping up a lot lately in the Celebrate the Boy Flickr group. Here are some of my favorite piping pics from the pool:

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I cannot even believe how much these overalls rock. There are many more photos of these amazing overalls (above) on Mamasha’s blog here.

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Bright red piping offers great contrast for these black and white cars!

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Top Left: lange benen. Top Right: Elastische paspel. Bottom Left: postbodejacob1. Bottom Right:  Jacob in ‘t oker.

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Left:  achterkant. Middle: Kabouterhemd. Right: glazend biesje.

La Inglesita blogged about this outfit here:

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Left: Blue Coat. Right: Pants (blogged here).

This adorable coat has a dedicated blog post here.
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And while we’re loving the yellow piping, this playsuit is just about too cute for words:

Oliver+S Playsuit

piping mosaic!

Top Left and Bottom: Orange Piping. Top Right: Green Pants.

*(Thanks to Dana for letting me use her checked shorts for the “Piping improves everything” button!)

The photos in this post came from the Celebrate the BOY Flickr group. Feel free to join the group and share your photos too!

Smiles.Details.kudzu cargo pants (pattern willow&co) and ziggy top (madeit patterns)I had to.Moshi Monster Hand painted shoesMoshi Monster Hand painted shoes

This post is part of Celebrate the BOY, a series of boy sewing posts hosted by me and Dana of MADE. Check out my Celebrate the BOY archives for more boy sewing posts.  Here’s what we’ve done so far:

DAY 1: Rae: Saffron Pants and Color Roundup / Dana: 5 Steps to the Basic Tee
DAY 2: Rae: Little Bit of Color Hoodie / Dana: Pants Roundup
DAY 3: Rae: Hoodie Tutorial / Dana: Kids Shorts/Pants with Back Pocket Tutorial
DAY 4: Rae: Show your Stripes Turtleneck / Dana: 13 DIY Fabrics
DAY 5: Rae: Stripes Roundup and Celebration Garland / Dana: Favorite Tee Shirt Buddy Toys
DAY 6: Rae: Fox Tee / Dana: Big Stick Jammies
DAY 7: Rae: Bold Prints Roundup / Dana: Beach Robe to House Robe Remix
DAY 8: Rae: City Pants / Dana: we be jammin PJ roundup
DAY 9: Rae: Mustache Roundup / Dana: Stripes, Checks, and Piping, oh my
Day 10: Rae: Piping Roundup / Dana: some like it Chewie, some like it Hoth (heee!!!)

Celebrate the BOY 2013

Tic-tac-toe shirt + piping how-to

I love piping. It makes everything better. Truly.

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When Elliot saw this “stitched” fabric (designed by Aneela Hoey) he said, “It looks like tic-tac-toe!” so that’s what we call this shirt now. The “tic-tac-toe” shirt. Sidenote: playing tic-tac-toe with a kindergartener is hilarious. I can beat the pants off of him every time, so most of the time I just let him win, though he’s slowly figuring out the tricks. It’s just funny to imagine a time when tic-tac-toe was still novel.

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In addition to the pockets and cuffs shown above, I added piping to the collar, yoke, and front edges of the shirt to give it a fun retro look.

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Just in case you’ve never made your own piping, let me briefly show you how I make mine:

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First, cut 1.25″ strips on the bias (45 degrees diagonally) using a rotary cutter and ruler (1). Then trim the ends square, overlap them so they are perpendicular, and stitch them together as shown (2). Trim and press the ends apart (3), and repeat steps 2 and 3 until your bias tape is long enough (4). Then take piping cord — usually a white narrow cord which you can buy by the yard or pre-packaged — and place it in the center of the bias tape (5). Fold the bias tape around the cord, and hold it in place with your fingers. Machine-baste the piping shut using a long stitch-length and stitching right next to, but not into, the cord (6). You’ll have to go slowly and readjust the bias tape by hand as you sew. Once you’ve sewn the entire length of bias tape, you’re ready to add piping to all kinds of things! Just cut it to the length you need and baste it in place.

By the way, there are plenty of great piping tutorials out there, with many different ways to make it. This is definitely not the only (or the best) way to make piping, but it works great for me. You should definitely take some time to check out Anna’s awesome no-sew piping tutorial if you haven’t already (BRILLIANT!), and Dana has an entire post series on bias tape that is also worth a read if you’re new to the bias-tape scene.

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I love the finished result. No pictures of the shirt in action yet, as I just barely finished it yesterday afternoon, but he did try it on briefly yesterday, and it fits!

OK, now you really must head over to MADE to see the piping shorts and awesome outfit that Dana made for her post today: Stripes, Checks, and Piping, oh my! You will love it!

Celebrate the BOY 2013

This post is part of Celebrate the BOY, a series of boy sewing posts hosted by me and Dana of MADE. Check out my Celebrate the BOY archives for more boy sewing posts.  Here’s what we’ve done so far:

DAY 1: Rae: Saffron Pants and Color Roundup / Dana: 5 Steps to the Basic Tee
DAY 2: Rae: Little Bit of Color Hoodie / Dana: Pants Roundup
DAY 3: Rae: Hoodie Tutorial / Dana: Kids Shorts/Pants with Back Pocket Tutorial
DAY 4: Rae: Show your Stripes Turtleneck / Dana: 13 DIY Fabrics
DAY 5: Rae: Stripes Roundup and Celebration Garland / Dana: Favorite Tee Shirt Buddy Toys
DAY 6: Rae: Fox Tee / Dana: Big Stick Jammies
DAY 7: Rae: Bold Prints Roundup / Dana: Beach Robe to House Robe Remix
DAY 8: Rae: City Pants / Dana: we be jammin PJ roundup
DAY 9: Rae: Mustache Roundup / Dana: Stripes, Checks, and Piping, oh my

Fun Trend Alert: Mustaches!

Have you noticed the mustache trend lately? It seems to me that mustaches are suddenly all over the place…and adding them to boys’ clothing seems like a fun way to ride the trend! What do you think?

neon moustache

Neon mustache tee from Oon, blogged here (we’ve been featuring her stuff regularly in our roundups this CTB. You absolutely must follow her if you don’t already.)

The picture at top right here totally KILLS me…so hilarious and great!!

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Top Left: Striped with Moustache. Right: Vader & Zoon.

Middle Left: Snorshort. Right: applique boy bib tutorial.

Bottom Left: Strong Man. Right: Moustache Applique.

And one more from Oon :

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blogged here.

The photos in this post came from the Celebrate the BOY Flickr group.  Feel free to join the group and share your photos, too!

Smiles.Details.kudzu cargo pants (pattern willow&co) and ziggy top (madeit patterns)I had to.Moshi Monster Hand painted shoesMoshi Monster Hand painted shoes

This post is part of Celebrate the BOY, a series of boy sewing posts hosted by me and Dana of MADE. Check out my Celebrate the BOY archives for more boy sewing posts.  Here’s what we’ve done so far:

DAY 1: Rae: Saffron Pants and Color Roundup / Dana: 5 Steps to the Basic Tee
DAY 2: Rae: Little Bit of Color Hoodie / Dana: Pants Roundup
DAY 3: Rae: Hoodie Tutorial / Dana: Kids Shorts/Pants with Back Pocket Tutorial
DAY 4: Rae: Show your Stripes Turtleneck / Dana: 13 DIY Fabrics
DAY 5: Rae: Stripes Roundup and Celebration Garland / Dana: Favorite Tee Shirt Buddy Toys
DAY 6: Rae: Fox Tee / Dana: Big Stick Jammies
DAY 7: Rae: Bold Prints Roundup / Dana: Beach Robe to House Robe Remix
DAY 8: Rae: City Pants / Dana: we be jammin PJ roundup

Celebrate the BOY 2013

City Pants

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I fell in love with this cityscape fabric at Dry Goods Design in Seattle last December; it was the end of the bolt, and I immediately thought of boy pants. When I realized that it matched the jersey fabric that I used for this hoodie, I was all over it.

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Here’s the problem with me and fabric: I get distracted by these lighter “quilting” cottons that look awesome because of their prints. I know I should be making pants with bottomweight fabrics like twill or denim, but it’s so hard when there are so many great prints out there!

As a result, I definitely had to add kneepads to them (again). But I wanted a kneepad different from the one on yesterday’s pant, so I went with a more classic oval shape. And then I wanted some pouch pockets on the front. And then I thought, why not use the tuxedo stripe to cover up the side of the pocket? And then…well, they ended up a bit short, so I added cuffs, too.

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These pants should really be called “Everything but the Kitchen Sink” pants, not City Pants. Seriously, Rae. They are a little Crazytown. But strangely, because the print is so subtle, all the “extras” I added blend in pretty well!

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Pattern: I made these pants with the same pattern that I used for both the brown pants with the tuxedo stripe and the Saffron Pant, and I am making good progress on getting this pant pattern ready for the pattern shop. It will come in nine different sizes (2-10) and has a ton of options for customizing, as you can already see. No surprise, since I can never do a pattern the same way twice. Rae-DD. It’ll be a good staple. Sign up for the newsletter on the sidebar if you want an update when it’s ready.

Let’s talk about pant patterns. This pant pattern is a TWO-piece pant, meaning there are two main pieces, a left and a right. The Big Butt Baby Pants and my free Newborn Pant pattern both fall into the TWO-piece pant pattern category, as well (though the B3Ps have an extra rear diaper panel). The other kind of pant pattern you see most frequently is a FOUR-piece pant (2 fronts, 2 backs), like Dana’s Kid Pant (a pattern which I know she also hopes to develop in multiple sizes, for sale eventually. Yay!! You can never have too many good pant patterns, I say!).

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Both of these have their advantages and disadvantages, to be sure. You can’t put certain kinds of pockets (like the side pockets you might find on a pair of jeans) on a two-piece pattern, and it is more difficult to get a flared shape without a side seam. But my big love affair with the two-piece pattern stems from the fact that it’s super fast. Since I make a TON of clothing for my kids, that counts for a lot. You can still do fun things like tuxedo stripes and pintucks and pockets with a two-piece. But I like a four-piece pattern to really be able to play with the shape of a pant (like a skinny jean, for instance), so having both types in your pattern collection comes in really handy.

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Anyway, these pants were made with a two-piece pattern, which is really very simple. But it’s also very easy just to add things to make them more interesting. To illustrate, here’s how I added the pouch pockets (see also yesterday’s post on adding the tuxedo stripe):

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(1) Cut two pocket pieces (mirror image) and two pocket linings.
(2) Pin each pocket piece to its lining, right sides facing. Sew together along the curved edges only (BUT! if you won’t be able to cover up the side edge with a tuxedo stripe or side seam, sew that side too, leaving just the top open).
(3) Turn it right side out.
(4) Press and add stitches along the top curve (optional).
(5) Pin it to the pant leg so that the side will be covered by the tuxedo stripe piece (sneaky, right?!?!). Then sew the pocket to the pant leg along the bottom curve.
(6) Sew the tuxedo stripe down, and finish the pants. You can fold up the top of the pocket right into the waistband to finish the top edge!

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Here’s my little rock star, rocking his new pants.

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Celebrate the BOY 2013

This post is part of Celebrate the BOY, a series of boy sewing posts hosted by me and Dana of MADE. Check out my Celebrate the BOY archives for more boy sewing posts.  Here’s what we’ve done so far:

DAY 1: Rae: Saffron Pants and Color Roundup / Dana: 5 Steps to the Basic Tee
DAY 2: Rae: Little Bit of Color Hoodie / Dana: Pants Roundup
DAY 3: Rae: Hoodie Tutorial / Dana: Kids Shorts/Pants with Back Pocket Tutorial
DAY 4: Rae: Show your Stripes Turtleneck / Dana: 13 DIY Fabrics
DAY 5: Rae: Stripes Roundup and Celebration Garland / Dana: Favorite Tee Shirt Buddy Toys
DAY 6: Rae: Fox Tee / Dana: Big Stick Jammies
DAY 7: Rae: Bold Prints Roundup / Dana: Beach Robe to House Robe Remix
DAY 8: Rae: City Pants / Dana: we be jammin PJ roundup

Tuxedo Stripe Pant

A tuxedo stripe is a a great way to feature a bold print in a fun way! Take these pants I made for Elliot:

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I put a little piece of the print on the patch pockets for another fun pop of print.

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Shown here with a Flashback Skinny Tee-turned-henley — another easy modification on the basic tee that I hope to show you how to do at some point.

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Tuxedo Stripe pant

These pants also look really great with the white and orange hoodie I made last week for this tutorial!

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But today let’s focus on the pants…they’re just a simple two-piece pant (so two main pieces; one for each leg) with a tuxedo stripe topstitched on the side. I also sewed the waistband with a flat-front (just like I did with the heart pants for Clementine; Dana has a great flat-front pant tutorial here that’s pretty similar to the way I do mine, if you’d like to give it a try). Here’s a basic how-to for the tuxedo stripe:

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If you use ribbon or a piece of bias tape that already had the edges folded under, you could skip the “fold and press under” part of Step 2, and just pin and stitch it down. But basically, you just topstitch the stripe onto the side of your pant, then fold up the ends of the stripe into the waistband and hems.

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As you can see, I also added kneepads. This fabric is a medium-weight cotton and is therefore prone to holes at the knees, so beefing up the knees will hopefully help these last longer; plus, I like how they look! Since there’s no side seam on these pants I just “hid” the edge of the kneepad under the tuxedo stripe, if that makes sense. I hope to share a more thorough how-to for this kneepad as well, but of course, there’s only so much time for this busy mama. Realistically, what I want to post and what I actually have time to post are two very different things, as I’m sure you all know. Such is life, right?

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You’re going to really miss this guy when Celebrate the BOY is over, aren’t you? Just a few more days left!

Updated: OH! Totally forgot to tell you: if you’re interested in purchasing the fabric that I designed for the stripe, you can find it on Spoonflower, right here.

Celebrate the BOY 2013

This post is part of Celebrate the BOY, a series of boy sewing posts hosted by me and Dana of MADE. Check out my Celebrate the BOY archives for more boy sewing posts.  Here’s what we’ve done so far:

DAY 1: Rae: Saffron Pants and Color Roundup / Dana: 5 Steps to the Basic Tee
DAY 2: Rae: Little Bit of Color Hoodie / Dana: Pants Roundup
DAY 3: Rae: Hoodie Tutorial / Dana: Kids Shorts/Pants with Back Pocket Tutorial
DAY 4: Rae: Show your Stripes Turtleneck / Dana: 13 DIY Fabrics
DAY 5: Rae: Stripes Roundup and Celebration Garland / Dana: Favorite Tee Shirt Buddy Toys
DAY 6: Rae: Fox Tee / Dana: Big Stick Jammies
DAY 7: Rae: Bold Prints Roundup / Dana: Beach Robe to House Robe Remix

Say yes to bold prints!

I’ve already shared two roundups based on my “rules” when it comes to sewing boys’ clothes (see the More Color! and Stripes Rule roundups from last week), and today I’ve got a third one for you:

PRINTSbutton

I love making clothes for Elliot that feature bold prints. These items have a track record of being the most-loved and most-worn items in his wardrobe. The fox tee I posted yesterday is one example, and the radio pants I made for Elliot last fall are another. Maybe you even remember Elliot’s green medal pants? Those things were awesome. Bold prints make clothing more fun and interesting, and they add color, as well.

Here are some fun pictures from the Celebrate the Boy Flickr group that I really love to get you thinking about how to use prints in your boy’s wardrobe!

Pants for Thor

Lots more photos of this adorable outfit here.

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1. t-shirtjes voor Matisse. 2. T(ea) for two.

Short for Nils

Mamasha blogged about these elephant overalls  here.

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1. olifanten set. 2. draken.

Oon blogged about these shirts here:
kleine maatjes

It’s not fair that floral prints aren’t always a popular choice for boys.  Look how great they look in three of the dapper shirts below:

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Top Left: feesthemd. Right: star T..

Bottom Left:  bloemenhemd. Right: nieuw hemdje.

Motorized vehicles are always a favorite among boys. They’re unstoppable in these prints!

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Left: black cars hoodie. Right: green pants.

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Top Left: blue cars hoodie. Top Right:  au travail. Bottom Left: autobroek. Bottom Right: helicopters.

Helicopters and tractors and trucks, oh my! The red contrast in this hoodie is stunning:
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The photos in this post came from the Celebrate the BOY Flickr group.  Feel free to join the group and share your photos, too!

Smiles.Details.kudzu cargo pants (pattern willow&co) and ziggy top (madeit patterns)I had to.Moshi Monster Hand painted shoesMoshi Monster Hand painted shoes

This post is part of Celebrate the BOY, a series of boy sewing posts hosted by me and Dana of MADE. Check out my Celebrate the BOY archives for more boy sewing posts.  Here’s what we’ve done so far:

DAY 1: Rae: Saffron Pants and Color Roundup / Dana: 5 Steps to the Basic Tee
DAY 2: Rae: Little Bit of Color Hoodie / Dana: Pants Roundup
DAY 3: Rae: Hoodie Tutorial / Dana: Kids Shorts/Pants with Back Pocket Tutorial
DAY 4: Rae: Show your Stripes Turtleneck / Dana: 13 DIY Fabrics
DAY 5: Rae: Stripes Roundup and Celebration Garland / Dana: Favorite Tee Shirt Buddy Toys
DAY 6: Rae: Fox Tee / Dana: Big Stick Jammies

Celebrate the BOY 2013