Hansel. So hot right now. Hansel.

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Today’s post is a very special post!!! If you’ve heard of the “Film Petit” series hosted by Jessica of A Little Gray and Kristin of skirt as top, you know that it’s an ongoing blog series where Kristin and Jess and another guest blogger make (often hilarious) costumes for their children inspired by their favorite films.

Well today, I’m the guest blogger, and just in case you haven’t guessed it yet, the film is one of my favorites…ZOOLANDER! Yes. That hilarious Ben Stiller film from way back in 2001. Famous for great one-liners (“I feel like I’m taking CRAZY PILLS”) and amazing costumes, especially on the men, which made it the perfect challenge for Film Petit.

Of course I thought Elliot would make the perfect Hansel, with his blond shaggy hair. In the movie, Hansel is played by Owen Wilson, and is an up-and-coming scooter-riding male model who wins the  Male Model of the Year award instead of Derek Zoolander, the movie’s main character, who has won three prior years in a row and considers himself a shoo-in. Their ensuing rivalry turns to friendship when they have to team up to prevent Mugatu (played by Will Ferrell) from killing the Malaysian prime minister.

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In the movie, Hansel wears an amazing blue suede fur-lined coat complete with gold trimmings to the Male Model Awards, and though it’s only on screen for a few minutes, as soon as I saw it I knew I had to make one.

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When Hansel rides up on his scooter to the awards and jumps into the air, you can see that the lining is gold lame and he even has a gold vest on under there.

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Elliot’s coat was made with fleece (which actually approximates the look of suede pretty well without the $$$ pricetag) and faux fur, and I did manage the gold lame lining and trim, along with a pair of semi-sparkly (though you can’t quite see this as well as I’d hoped) gold linen pants to match. Along with a necklace and tattoo to match Hansel’s, he really got into character, as you can see.

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Hansel has some pretty hilarious lines…

“I wasn’t like every other kid, you know, who dreams about being an astronaut, I was always more interested in what bark was made out of on a tree. Richard Gere’s a real hero of mine.”

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“Sting. Sting would be another person who’s a hero. The music he’s created over the years, I don’t really listen to it, but the fact that he’s making it, I respect that.”

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“Who are you tryin’ to get crazy with, ese? Don’t you know I’m loco?”

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And here’s my little Hansel, riding his scooter to the award show:

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I had so much fun planning and making this costume, and Elliot LOVES it, though I have to admit he probably loves the crayola-marker tattoo even more. He really wanted to wear it to school to show his friends.

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I hope you enjoyed seeing my version of Hansel!! Now you definitely need to head over to skirt as top for some hilarious walk-off photos with Kristin’s little Derek and Hansel, and then over to A Little Gray for the perfect Maury Ballstein and Hansel-inspired sweater dress. You can access links to ALL of the Film Petit posts from this post or visit the Film Petit flickr pool to see what everyone’s been making!

Thanks so much for having me Kristin and Jess!!

My two cuties in Fanfare from head to toe

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By request: blue foxes for E and pink foxes for C.

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Fabric: Fanfare, organic flannels designed by me for Cloud9 collective

Patterns:
Charlie Tunic (with curved bottom hem and 3/4 sleeve for Clementine), and basic Parsley Pants (in size 4 and 6 with a cuff added)

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You didn’t think they always got along, did you? They do pretty well though.

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Pennant Pants with Sherpa Pockets

Today’s Fanfare project is a pair of flannel pants that I made for Elliot. You didn’t think I would just sew clothes for the girl, did you?

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One of the reasons I love Pinterest is that it gives me so many ideas for sewing for Elliot (you can see my “Elliot” board here). And I love seeing when someone else uses a pin for inspiration on a sewing project, so I’m going to show you the pin that inspired these pants, even though I’m a little embarrassed that these pants really didn’t quite hit the mark. If you look at that link, you can maybe see that what I was going for here was something like sweatpants, with a knit waistband and cuffs. But the truly awesome thing is the sherpa pockets, which Elliot loves because they are so warm and cosy.

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Anyway, I keep studying these while he’s wearing them because I feel like they’re either a little too wide or a little too narrow (I used the Parsley Pants sewing pattern as a starting point, just cut off the waistband foldover at the top and tapered the legs). Or maybe a little too long, because when he wears them you can’t really see the cuffs very well? But he’s turning into a little stringbean, so I HAD to make them long because he’s starting to grow out of all of the size 6 Parsley Pants I made him last spring already. Stop growing, little dude!

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So I’m not sure if I should keep tinkering with them or not, but at any rate E loves them and has already worn them three days in a row (including to school yesterday), so that’s a win, right? But don’t you think they would be even greater with a pair of SHERPA KNEEPADS??? Or is that completely insane to put white kneepads on a pair of boy’s pants. I think I am answering my own question.

*JAZZ HANDS*

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The fabric of course is Fanfare, my line of organic flannels for Cloud9 Fabrics, which is in fabric shops right now. I used the amazing Michael Miller Organic sherpa for the pockets (which is currently in stock over at Fabricworm) and a grey rib knit for the cuffs and waistband.

I’ve been hosting a Fanfare blog tour for the past week, so if you’d like to see all of those posts, you can click here. We’ve got just one more stop on the tour tomorrow, and then it will be back to the usual randomness around here after that!

This blog is proudly sponsored by

Parsley Shorts in Action

I just finished another pair of Parsley shorts for Clementine, this pair in a lovely Oxford fabric from Yuwa called “Cat and Bird” (I found the fabric here).

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I had considered making her a matching Flashback Tee to go with them, but this morning she put together this genius ensemble, making me wonder why I ever bother making matching clothes for her. I can’t say it would have ever occurred to me to put these two things together, but it works (shirred Pierrot tunic blogged here).

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They look a little puffy in the bum, but that’s because there’s an entire ruffled hem tucked in there.

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Here are some “new” poses she insisted on (please don’t pin these pics below; the ones above are fine, though). Very creative, this girl. I sense that she may have a future in theater.

Parsley Shorts

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Now for a few shots of Elliot’s moon shorts (you can see a better shot of them in this post):

Parsley Shorts

Parsley Shorts

And that is my little Zombie. Having grown up in a house full of girls, I can safely say I never imagined I would have a six-year-old who was obsessed with zombies. I for one did not know what a zombie was when I was six, that’s for sure. I certainly never anticipated that his preschool teacher would pull me aside last year and explain that it is NOT OK to talk about zombies at preschool because it was frightening the other children. THAT was a bit embarrassing. Oops.

If you would like to make the Parsley Pants pattern into shorts, you’ll find a very handy little how-to over on this post. Check it out!

This blog is proudly sponsored by

A look back at my year in sewing

I’ve been seeing lots of project roundups from last year pop up on other people’s blogs over the past week, and I realized how much I enjoy them. I love seeing a bunch of things from the entire year presented in one place! So satisfying. It just appeals to my visual side. So I started to look through all of my projects from this past year to see if I could sum up my 2012 projects in photos. It turns out that’s a pretty big job, yikes. At the same time, I definitely started to see some general trends. For instance, I sewed a TON of stuff for me this year, especially dresses and tops (YAY!!):

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1. scarfonme, 2. Sparkler Top, 3. libertytop1, 4. Wiksten Tank by Rae, 5. green snow white top ., 6. Charcoal striped shirt by Rae, 7. Alabama Chanin Babydoll, 8. teal tee with green skinnies, 9. figuring the eight

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1. Washi Dress, 2. Pink washi maxi dress, 3. Summersville Washi top, 4. aqua washi dress, 5. Time for Tea, 6. aquawashi7, 7. Orange Washi, 8. hello pilgrim full length, 9. Ruby Star Washi Dress

I’m super proud of what I accomplished this year when it comes to sewing for myself. Believe it or not, I learned a ton of new techniques and I feel like the things this year I made are more comfortable and wearable than clothing I’ve made for myself in the past. I also made a TON of stuff for Clementine (DOUBLE YAY!!!):

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1. Pink Geranium Dress, 2. fauxfurcoat, 3. flutter sleeve linen dress, 4. Princess and the Pea Dress, 5. pomegranate pierrot, 6. yellowjacket, 7. Bubblegum Dress, 8. nursery versery pamama pants, 9. charliegreensnowwhite, 10. geranium fox top 4, 11. whale shirt, 12. pink and gold crochet sweater, 13. Striped flashback tee with puff sleeve, 14. Little folks dress, 15. pierrotwithabow, 16. Charlie Dress

So that’s cool. BUT. For the boy? Not so much.

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1. flashback13, 2. awesomepants1, 3. shirtshorts5, 4. short sleeved flashback tee

OOPS.

It makes me really want to sew more for this little guy. The crazy part is, he really likes to wear things I make for him (unlike Clementine who is very hit or miss and usually requires bribery to get photos), so I actually do sew quite a bit of stuff for him, but not much of it ever makes it onto the blog because it’s always a little bit boring. Like two plain brown Flashback tees. A pair of grey linen pants. Yeah. Time to amp it up in the boy department, Rae.

So, my sewing goals for the new year…hmmm. I think we should Celebrate the BOY, don’t you? I’d also like to try more skirts and pants for myself this year. And I know this might seem strange, but I think I need to cut back on the amount of stuff I sew for Clementine. It is really fun to sew for her, but she seriously had more clothing this year than I knew what to do with, it was crazy.

On the Fourth Day of Christmas [NOW CLOSED]

Thanks for entering! This giveaway is now closed, but you can come back tomorrow morning for another lovely giveaway!

Twelve Days of Christmas


On the fourth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me….four colly* birds, three French hens, two turtle doves and a partridge in a pear tree!

….and Rae gave to me a Charlie Tunic sewing pattern!

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As you can see, there is no shortage of cute going on here:

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1. red & gold, 2. ugly duckling, 3. pink buttons, 4. brown with short sleeves

Check out the Charlie Tunic Photo Pool on Flickr HERE.

The tunic looks just as adorable as a dress, which is easily done using the Charlie Dress Add-on, an extra option for the Charlie Tunic. Both the tunic AND the dress add-on will make up the prize for today’s giveaway.

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To enter to win a copy of both the Charlie Tunic sewing pattern and Charlie Dress Add-on, just leave a comment by 9 PM tonight (EST). One comment per person; void where prohibited by law. I’ll pick a winner using the random number generator and notify the winner by email; we’ll also post a list of all of the winners at the end of the series to make sure we don’t miss anyone. This prize will be emailed to the winner as a PDF.

*OK. Now we need to talk about this “colly” bird thing, right? I have always sung the song “four calling birds,” but when we looked up the lyrics it was “colly” nearly everywhere, I tell you. As best I can tell, “calling” is actually an American mispronounciation of the original “colly” birds, which apparently are blackbirds. Who knew?

Exhibit 4: Awesomest Pair of Pants on a 5-year-old ever

This week, as part of my personal countdown to KCWC, I’m throwing pictures at the blog of things I’ve made for the kids this year that never got blogged. It’s my own little challenge, to try and “clean out the virtual closet” before I go and make more clothes for them next week. I’ll even show you some of the new kids patterns I’ve been working on. Fun Fun!

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I cut these pants out last December (you may remember me bemoaning my chronic procrastination and the ginormous pile of unfinished projects in a post entitled Overcoming Christmas Craft-Related Despair, this was one of those projects, I declared at the time that they would someday become “the Awesomest Pair of Pants on a 5-year-old ever”). I finally finished them last week. I am just going to have to accept that it takes me 10 months to complete things sometimes, there’s no getting around that sad, sad fact. I’m amazed they didn’t come out too short, actually. Way to go, me! *pats self on back*

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Pattern is the (now discontinued) Dapper Dillingers by Patterns by Figgys, fabric from the Ruby Star Rising line, designed by Melody Miller for Kokka. One of my favorite prints ever.

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He rocks these, clearly.

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To see all of my KCWC-countdown posts:

To read more about KCWC and sign yourself up (just leave a comment, easy peasy!), click here:

KCWC Countdown!

Kid’s Clothes Week Challenge is coming up next week. I always feel a little sheepish participating, because I actually *do* have plenty of time to sew each week (the challenge is to take 1 hour every day and sew for your kids) because I am already lucky enough to have 2 or 3 days each week when the kids are both in preschool and kindergarten, and I’ve designated that time very strictly as “work-time” so that I can write blog posts, design patterns, and sew. It’s surprising though how little of that time actually turns into real sewing time for stuff for my kids though, so KCWC is a great motivator for me to look through the closet, find the gaps, and make the things that need making…like leggings, or fall coats, or whatever.

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This morning I sat down to make my KCWC goals and started piling up fabric and patterns and soon decideed I really need to try and coordinate a little bit with what I’ve already made them (you know, maybe try and match some of what they already have?) or it’s going to turn into Crazytown over here. So I opened up iPhoto, to look for pictures of stuff I made them already this year, and realized that I have a HUGE backlog of handmade garments that got sewn, but never blogged. Sheesh. Before I can start making more clothes for Elliot and Clementine, I really want to unload these photos on the blog.

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So this week, as part of my personal countdown to KCWC, I’m going to be throwing pictures at the blog of things I’ve made for the kids this year that never got blogged. It’s my own little challenge, to try and “clean out the virtual closet” before I go and make more clothes for them. I’ll even show you some of the new kids patterns I’ve been working on. That will be fun. Here we go!!!

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To see all of my KCWC-countdown posts:

To read more about KCWC and sign yourself up (just leave a comment, easy peasy!), click here:

Ship Shape Button Placket Tutorial

OUT TO SEA DIY BLOG TOURsmallbutton

I’m so excited to be part of Sarah Jane’s Out to Sea Blog Tour today! I’m going to show you the adorable Charlie Tunic I made for Elliot with two of the Out to Sea prints, along with a tutorial on how to add the button placket.

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The Out to Sea collection is absolutely stunning. Sarah is so talented! We met last Spring at Quilt Market and got to see this collection first hand in all of its glory. I also really love her first line, Children at Play, with sweet illustrations that show the carefree days of childhood. I think it’s great that her fabric collections have both featured a number of designs for BOYS!

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Don’t worry though, still plenty of prints for girls as you can see below (see more here). Sarah has designed a lovely collection of Wall Art prints to go with the Out to Sea fabrics as well.

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One of the best things about this collection for me (besides the amazing designs that Sarah draws) is the fact that this line is printed on the cotton couture substrate from Michael Miller. Translation: totally soft, lovely, lightweight cottons perfect for not only quilting, but many types of garments as well. I just had to try it out on a Charlie Tunic for Elliot!

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I thought it would be so clever to have him pose with his Playmobil ship, which goes PERFECTLY with this fabric. For some reason he did not find this as clever as I did.

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He was more about putting the ship in front of his face.

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Then I asked him what his favorite part of the ship was. Guess.

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That’s right, the cannon. He then proceeded to shoot the little spring-loaded cannonball at my head, which made contact with my forehead about the exact same time I took this shot.

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He thought that was pretty clever.

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For this tutorial, I thought I’d show you how to add a cute little button placket that extends across the gap that gets created when you add the neck facings on the outside of the Charlie Tunic. This is a nice way to finish the neckline that doesn’t require button loops!

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Note: I used my Charlie Tunic Sewing Pattern for this one, but really you could add reverse facings to ANY pullover pattern with a simple neckline like Charlie – just trace around the neckline and shoulders and add 2-3″ around the outside and down the center to make a the facing pieces.

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Step 1: Cut out all your pieces.

You’ll need a front and back, two sleeves, a front facing, a back facing, and a placket piece. Cut your placket piece 3″ wide and plenty long so you can trim it down later. The length really depends on the size of your tunic, but 10″ long is PLENTY. I chose to interface my facings but it’s completely optional.

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Step 2: Sew the shoulder seams

I used a 1/2″ seam here. It’s really important to finish these seams with a serger, a french seam, or a flat-felled seam; if it frays, it will show at the neckline!

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Step 3: Mark placket location and measure how big your placket needs to be

Make two marks along the center line of the front facing: one where the neckline seam allowance hits (dotted line) and another where the bottom of the slit will be (the black dot on the pattern piece). Measure between these marks.

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Step 4: Cut your placket piece to size

Add 1/2″ to the measurement you found in Step 3 and cut the placket strip that new length.

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Step 5: Sew the placket piece together

Fold the placket piece in half lengthwise with its wrong side facing out. Sew the ends together with 1/4″ seams. Turn it right-side out and press.

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Step 6: Baste the placket to the front facing

Now place the placket piece between the two marks you made, just over the center line, and machine baste in place along the center line Don’t skip this step. I’m talking to you, Basting Skippers!!

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Step 7: Get the facings ready

Use the same seam allowance you used for the shoulder seams in Step 2 (1/2″) to sew the front facing and back facing together. Press the seams apart. Then press 1/4″ under around the entire outside edge of the facing. Clip the front curves to make this easier.

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Step 8: Pin the facings to the neckline

Be very careful to keep the facing perfectly centered on both the front and back; then pin all the way around the facings.

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Then go ahead and draw where you are going to stitch — around the neck, down the middle of the placket, and up the other side — with a fabric pen and ruler. I draw my lines just over 1/8″ away from the center line (use the basting stitches as a guide).

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Step 9: Sew the facings around the neckline and down/up the center.

Now you’re going to sew all the way around the neckline with a 1/2″ seam, then pivot on your needle and sew down the center line, pivot again and sew a few stitches across, and then pivot again and go back up the center line, etc, until you have sewn around the entire facing/neckline. You want to be SURE that you are sewing through the placket on one side, but not on the other, so stick to those marks you made. Be careful when you turn the corner closest to the placket — you want to make sure that you don’t accidentally sew it down!

Then trim the neckline to 1/4″ and cut right down the middle of the center front stitch lines. Clip to the corners at the bottom of the placket as close as you can without going through the stitching.

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Step 10: Turn the facings to the outside and stitch down

This is the fun part. Press the entire neckline and then flip the facings all the way around to the outside. Press the seams again so the facings lay flat, and pin them in place.

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Nice right? Now edgestitch around the outside of the facings to stitch them down. A double row of stitches looks nice here.

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Step 11: Complete the rest of the top

Start by attaching the sleeves:

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and then sewing the side seams, hemming the bottom, and finishing the cuffs. I used a contrast cuff as shown in the Charlie Tunic instructions.

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Then it’s time to play with button placement! There are so many options…you can keep the button flap on the outside and put the buttonholes on it as shown above, or even put buttons on both sides with the button placket underneath:

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I decided to put the buttons on the placket underneath and sew some buttonholes in the facing right along the center. You could also sew on snaps or even velcro, but I personally like the buttons more.

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So sew those buttons and buttonholes, and your top is finished!

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Thanks for having me as part of the tour, Sarah! Click over to the Sarah Jane blog to see more of her designs and snap up a coupon code for $2 off the Charlie Tunic Sewing Pattern that’s good until Friday.

OUT TO SEA DIY BLOG TOURsmallbutton

You can see all of the posts in the Out to Sea blog tour by clicking on the image above