Ruby Dress in chambray and voile

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I needed some new photos for the print cover of the Ruby Dress Sewing Pattern so I had Karen whip up this chambray and voile version last week at the studio. I have been hoarding this fabric forever and ever so it’s fun to have finally turned it into something wearable.

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Ruby will be the next women’s pattern of mine to go into print. It’s true that I already have some great photos of Ruby — this Leah Duncan Tule/grey chambray version was a big hit — but it seems a bit misleading to use that one for the paper pattern cover because it shows the yoke with a lining rather than the default bias-bound neck and armholes. The lining technique IS covered in my video series for adding a yoke lining, but the instructions were a bit too complicated to put into a pattern meant for beginners; it’s really better seen than read. So I guess the question is: is it OK to put a lined version on the cover, if we have to send people to the website to see the videos? I don’t know. The second question is: will this version (made with gorgeous Anna Maria Horner voile and indigo union chambray) SELL the dress as well as the original dress? I hope so. What do you think?

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Anyway, now I have a beautiful summer dress and some new photos to boot — my sister Elli just had a baby a month earlier than expected (more on that hopefully soon!!!) so things are moving a little slower than usual in the pattern production department, but that’s fine. It’s a Baby Year over here, and I think that is pretty fantastic.

You can purchase the Ruby Dress Sewing Pattern (in a PDF version!) right here.

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Fanfare for Baby!

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Fanfare for Baby Hugo!

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Pants: Big Butt Baby Pants in Fanfare flannel + yellow Shot Cotton. Perfect for his cute little cloth diaper bum.

Crib Sheet: made using Dana’s Crib Sheet Tutorial (I had to modify the dimensions a bit because the flannel shrinks down to about 41″ wide)

Changing Pad Cover: this is a FREE printable tutorial that I put together last summer, available from the Cloud9 website!

Nursery Prints: by Ingela Arrhenius; I found them here. Wall color is Sherwin Williams Waterfall.

Fun news: Fanfare is being REPRINTED in MORE COLORS and will be available later this summer! You can sneak a peek here, and I’ll post pics of my new samples soon!!!

More pics of the baby. I can’t resist.

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Fanfare for Baby Hugo!

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Summer is for Josephines and Rubies

Some hot and steamy days are ahead of us, so I wanted to share some of my favorite summery renditions of my Josephine and Ruby patterns.

Even though we released the Josephine Tunic & Blouse when hot weather was the furthest thing from my mind, View C has instructions to make a sleeveless top with side vents. Jaime from Fancy Tiger Crafts made a gorgeous version out of Cloud9 Fabrics’ Palos Verdes Voile.

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Terri at Fa Sew La has made a bunch of Josephines already! Here’s her sleeveless one:

Josephine 1

As the mercury rises, I’ve rekindled my love for the Ruby Dress & Top pattern. It sews up so quickly, and it’s versatile: wear it with shorts or a skirt, or enjoy it on its own as a light, breezy dress.

Sarah made this bright and cheery dress and blogged about it here.

sarah ruby

I love the bold prints paired with solid yokes on all of these:

ruby mosaic

Above, Top Left: I Sew You Sew’s Ruby top with a Washi Expansion Pack [shortened] sleeve!
Top Right: Meagan blogged about her top here, and put a nice curved Wiksten Tank hem on it. Nice mashup!

Bottom Left: Spencer’s dress
Bottom Right: Katie’s dress

Have you made any summery Rubies or Josephines? Share them with us on Instagram with hashtags #rubydress and #josephinepattern, or in their Flickr photo pools!

Josephine

Josephine with partial tucksJosephine with partial tucksJosephine with partial tucksJosephine with partial tucksJosephine with partial tucksJosephine Blouse (sleeveless)


Ruby

Ruby FrontRuby BackRuby TopRuby TopRuby Top with lined yokeChambray and Voile Ruby Dress


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Pink Dotted Geranium for Clementine

pink and gold dot Geranium

Other people might be fooled by your doll-like appearance, your proclivity towards pink. But I know the truth, Clementine: you are a tough little nut and every ounce as stubborn as your mother. Delicate would not be a word I would use to describe you. Strong, silly, fierce, smart, mischievious. Then also: adorable, affectionate, and sweet. An interesting combination that keeps us on our toes.

Pink and Gold Geranium

You draw ninjas instead of princesses. Another recent drawing that comes to mind featured a bomb. And a person cut in half on the ground.

Pink and Gold Geranium

You have a spider-sense for locating lost objects, which comes in handy given the fact that I am a complete space cadet. When something’s missing, we ask “Hey Clementine! Where’s Hugo’s pacifier??”

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You have the most hilarious expressions and faces. Cross-eyes, silly smiles, teeth over the bottom lip. The fact that you can’t say your “R’s” yet makes it even cuter.

pink and gold Geranium

Despite your many tantrums and screaming fits (what IS it about this age??), you also know how to snuggle like nobody’s business. You can’t stop giving Hugo cuddles and kisses. And when you crawl in bed with us in the middle of the night after a bad dream and fall asleep next to Daddy, you look like an absolute angel. You know, as long as you’re asleep.

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Dress: Geranium Dress Sewing Pattern, with a velvet ribbon added at the bottom of the bodice
Fabric: Michael Miller Pearlized Dots, purchased at Pink Castle

pink and gold Geranium

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Made By Rae Geranium Dress

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Bianca Sewing Pattern is Here!

Introducing my newest sewing pattern: Bianca! Yaaaaaaaaay!!! *does Kermit arms*

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This breezy top or dress is a great project for the beginner or the more experienced sewist looking for a quick warm-weather sew! The Bianca pattern features a notched neckline and a flattering gathered waist in six sizes (XS–XXL) and two lengths (top or dress).

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Variations include a choice of elastic casing or shirring at the waist, options for either closed side seams or side vents, and tips for sewing your Bianca with contrasting facings on the outside of the garment (as in the photo below). A section on simple pattern adjustments will help you to achieve the perfect customized fit!

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The instructions and diagrams are thorough, easy to follow, and full of hints and tips. We’ve also included a 1-page summary of the instructions, or “cheat sheet” if you will, so you don’t need to print out the entire pattern, and a special “Seam Finishes Appendix” with instructions for my favorite seam finishes so your Bianca will be beautiful both inside and out!

Sizes Included
This pattern comes in a range of six women’s sizes, from XS through XXL. Refer to the charts below to find your size.

Materials List

  • Woven or knit fabric (see recommendations and yardage chart below).
  • For elastic at waist (choose one): 1 yard 1/4″- or 3/8″-wide elastic for elastic casing OR elastic thread for shirring
  • 1/3 yard lightweight or featherweight fusible interfacing, recommended for fabrics with a lot of drape (rayon challis), stretch (knits), or a loose weave (linen, shot cotton, double gauze)
  • Coordinating thread

Recommended woven fabrics: lightweight cotton and linen blends such as voile, rayon challis, shot cotton, shirting, double gauze, lawn, and broadcloth. Bianca is especially flattering when made with fabrics that have a nice drape!

Recommended knit fabrics: choose a stable knit such as interlock or jersey with less than 30% stretch. [Note: To check stretch, cut a 10" long strip of knit, cutting across the width of the fabric (this is the direction of most stretch) and stretch it as far as it will comfortably stretch. A knit with 30% or less stretch will stretch to no more than 13" total]

You may want to check out my post on garment fabrics here.

See more!

You’ll find a helpful shirring tutorial HERE.

Bianca has been featured previously on on my blog in the following posts:

Tomato Rayon Top, for me
Pink Voile Tunic, for me was a precursor to Bianca, way back from 2011! It has similar construction, but the neckline is different, and the drawstrings have been replaced by elastic in Bianca.
Meet Jess and her awesome Nani Iro Bianca (here you can see the garment with the contrast outer facing)
Two Bianca Dresses
Rae’s Spring Top: Liberty Tunic with Ties is another precursor to Bianca. This top is slightly longer than the current pattern, it has a contrast outer facing, and it has ties instead of elastic or shirring.

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I’d love to see what people are making with the Bianca Pattern! Please post pictures of your finished Bianca Tops and Dresses to the Bianca Sewing Pattern Pool on Flickr!

Bianca Top with Pom-pomsBianca Top with Pom-pomsBianca Top with Pom-pomsBianca Top with Pom-pomsBianca Maxi dress 1Bianca Maxi dress 2

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Ruby Sparkles

posted by jess

Well, Summer arrived the other day. And my hair said, “We’re thinking big.” I should have prepared myself, because when I posted this photo on IG, my hairdresser later texted me, “Wow Nice texture! I’m sure that will be a lot of fun throughout the humid season.” I’m strategically not letting you see the right-hand side of my head in these photos, because it has a different hairdo.

Whoops, I didn’t hijack Rae’s blog to talk about my hair though; I actually wanted to do some show and tell from my own Spring Top Sewing. I just finished my favorite Ruby to date, and I thought I’d share the mods I made.

I cut out the fabric for the top and didn’t change the length at all. You can hardly tell, but I put an elastic in the hem. I sewed the hem exactly as indicated in the pattern, but left a 1″ opening to thread a 1/4″ elastic through the entire hem. I held it in place with a safety pin to try it on, then sewed the elastic ends together before finishing off the hem. I have a couple of store-bought tops that have the really loose elastic in the hem, and I like how it gives the top a little bit more shape on me.

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Instead of sewing gathers in the back, I made a box pleat.

ruby back

I followed Rae’s yoke lining video tutorials, and used bias binding for the exposed portion of the armholes.

Instead of turning the bias binding to the outside of the garment like Rae did here, I sewed the bias tape to the outside of the armhole, then folded it all the way in before topstitching (Rae did that on this version).

j ruby 1

Finally, a word about the fabric. For the yoke, I used Kaffe Fasset Shot Cottons (colorway lipstick for the outer, and apricot for the lining). The main fabric for the top is a score from the covered Bazaar in Istanbul. There is some really gaudy stuff there, let me tell you. This print is less visually stimulating than a lot of what I saw there, believe it or not. It’s a simple black background with fuchsia, peach, and pink fireworks, upon which gold and pink roses have been superimposed. Then they glued on some sequin-like sparkles for good measure. Honestly, I don’t usually wear much in the way of shiny/sparkly, but I think the solid yoke contrast helps calm things down a bit, and this top is crazy comfy. I think I’ll be wearing this a lot!

Spring Top Sewalong 2014 is underway! Read more here; and add your photos to the Flickr Pool!

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Josephine Sewing Pattern is here!

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I’m so excited to announce the release of my Josephine Sewing Pattern! We’ve been working hard to get this pattern ready and I hope you’ll enjoy sewing it up! One of my favorite things about Josephine is the pleats on the front; I think it creates a really sophisticated look even though they are really very easy to sew! The three views included in the pattern are:

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View A -  a tunic version with a wider sleeve, narrow belt, and elasticized cuff (blogged here)

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View B – a blouse version with a cuffed bracelet-length sleeve and an elastic casing in the back for a very flattering fit (blogged here)

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View C – a sleeveless blouse with a center front slit and side vents (blogged here)

Of course the options that come with each view are interchangeable so you can customize your Josephine to make many different variations!

This pattern is a great project for the confident beginner sewist who is ready to add some skills and variety to their garment-sewing repertoire. The instructions and diagrams are thorough, easy to follow, and full of hints and tips. We’ve also included a special “Seam Finishes Appendix” in this pattern with instructions for my favorite seam finishes as well!

Sizes Included

This pattern comes in a range of six women’s sizes, from XS through XXL, with two bodice pieces included for each size: one has an A/B cup bust dart, and the other has a C/D cup bust dart. I’m hoping this will allow for a great fit for many shapes and sizes!! Refer to the charts below to find your size, and choose to make the A/B or C/D depending on your bra cup size.

Materials List

  • Woven fabric (see yardage chart below for amounts)
  • 1/2 yard 1/4″ elastic (View A, elastic cuff option only)
  • 1/2 yard 3/8″ elastic (View B only)
  • Coordinating thread

Recommended fabrics: woven cotton and linen blend fabrics such as voile, rayon challis, shot cotton, shirting, double gauze, lawn, and broadcloth. You may want to check out my post on garment fabrics here.

See more!
Josephine has been featured previously on on my blog in the following posts:

Fall Pattern Preview: Josephine!
Josephine in Yellow Double Gauze
Pale Pink Josephine Top
My (handmade) maternity style
Am giant festive candy cane (made with the Josephine pattern + the pointed cap sleeve from my Washi Expansion Pack)

(Please note: Josephine isn’t intended to be a maternity sewing pattern, but the last two posts linked here show that I found it quite comfortable as a maternity top during the 1st and 2nd trimester)

I’d love to see what people are making with the Josephine Pattern! Please post pictures of your finished Josephine Blouses and Tunics to the Josephine Sewing Pattern Pool on Flickr!

Josephine with partial tucksJosephine with partial tucksJosephine with partial tucksJosephine with partial tucksJosephine with partial tucksJosephine Blouse (sleeveless)

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KCW: Twirl Skirt and Tee for Clementine

This week is Kids Clothes Week so despite the fact that we moved to a new house  a couple days ago, I wanted to post at least a couple of the things I finished up for Clementine last week, this pink Flashback Tee and a twirly skirt with pockets:

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Truth be told, I am unsure of whether I should participate in KCW anymore — the challenge seems more appropriate for the stay-at-home mama who needs to scrape together an hour each night to sew by the light of Netflix to get some cool stuff made for her kids than me, who feels like a total poser with my fancy pants sewing studio and my work hours during which I could conceivably sew sew sew all the fun cute things for my kids all the live-long-day if I wanted to (though in reality that is not how it goes down). I even have Tashina and Karen assisting me at the studio so it’s hard to even keep track of who sewed WHAT around here anymore.

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For instance, I think Tashina probably sewed a few shoulder/side seams on this tee, and I’m pretty sure she did the skirt gathering stitches and put the elastic in the waistband too. So does it count? I’m probably just being totally angst-y and stupid about it, I just feel like I should be up front about the fact that when you see something from me in the KCW pool, there’s a chance I didn’t completely construct it myself. Anyway, despite being unsure of whether or not it’s “cheating” for me to sew along (oh! did I mention that Made by Rae sponsors KCW? Sooo there’s that too), I still try to plan out a few things to make for my kids every time KCW rolls around.

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Let’s talk about the outfit, shall we? The Flashback Tee was made with Robert Kaufman Laguna jersey (a quick search of my sponsors shows Pink Castle carries it as of this writing and Fabric Stash has some nice knit solids that might be similar) which is a fantastic jersey that’s quite affordable and has a nice recovery (which means it springs back to its original shape nicely after you stretch it). The skirt was made using my “Made-To-Measure Skirt” method, which is from class I teach here in Ann Arbor (sorry no pattern/tute yet), and was made with Liberty Lifestyle fabric, which is Liberty’s “quilting cotton.” I love this print.

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Clementine loves twirling in her new skirt!

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By some awesome coincidence, the skirt also happens to match a pair of tights I bought from Boden last year, so this outfit totally goes together in a way most of her hand-picked outfits never do. Chances of her wearing all three together ever again after these photos were taken? Probably zero. But at least she has two new pieces that I know she will wear, even if she never wears them all together again.

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Ruby with a washi sleeve

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One of the most common questions I got when the Ruby Dress pattern came out this summer was “can you add a sleeve to it?” It was hard for me to say “not yet!” but I knew that we had two new gathered sleeves coming out in both the Washi Expansion Pack and the Josephine pattern (we’re working on it!) that would work nicely with Ruby. I finally had a chance to test the Washi XP sleeve out on this Ruby top (fabric is Anna Maria Horner’s Field Study rayon challis) and it worked great!

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I love a gathered sleeve because the generous fit means it’s comfortable, and it’s easy to sew because it will fit just about any armhole. Because I love to mix and match when I sew for myself, rather than making the same thing over and over (hence Washi XP), it made sense to design a sleeve that will be interchangeable with all of my patterns. At some point I would like to make an ungathered, fitted sleeve too, but I really prefer the gathered sleeve right now. Anyway, this is one step closer to my dream of creating a portfolio of women’s patterns that all work well together so you can make endless variations.

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So you can see that I took these photos a while back, when I was about 12 weeks pregnant…not much of a belly to show for myself there yet! (Now? There’s no hiding it)

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To add a Washi XP sleeve to Ruby (and this will work with the Josephine sleeve as well), you simply sew the entire dress or top together up to the side seam step, then gather the top of the sleeve between the marks and sew it to the armhole. Once the sleeve is attached, you can finish the side seams and hem the dress and sleeve, and you’re done. Pretty simple! It’s a bit more difficult to add a sleeve AND a lining for the Ruby yoke, but it can be done. If you really want to try this, you might want to email me first so I can send you a little step-by-step.

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By the way, probably the second most common question I get about the Ruby is “can it be made with knits?” We added knits to the list of recommended fabrics for the main part of the Ruby, but not the yoke, with the idea that the yoke really shouldn’t be made from knits unless it’s a super-stable (non-stretchy) knit. It makes sense right? If your yoke stretches out, the whole top is going to look kinda saggy. So the answer is, yes, Ruby can be made with knit fabrics, but shoot for less stretchy knits like interlock or jerseys with less stretch to avoid getting a saggy yoke and armhole.

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