Parsley & Moon Pants Roundup

Now that it’s fall and I’m working on sewing my own pants, I thought it would be fun to take a look at what people have been making with my kids’ pants patterns!

parsley & moon fall 15 roundup

top left: Jane’s kids are comfy in chambray Geranium Dress and Parsley Pants
top right: Tuxedo Stripes!
bottom left: Anna used some Rain Walk (her line for Cloud9 Fabrics) to make Geranium and Parsley
bottom right: Angela made these Moon Pants with a Flashback Sweatshirt (here’s the whole outfit)

The Parsley Pants pattern is so simple and infinitely adaptable. Once you get the basic steps down, you can customize the style (by adding pockets! a flat front waistband! tuxedo stripes!) and combine fabrics to make Parsleys into PJs, dress pants, costumes, you name it.

The Moon Pants are newer to my pattern collection, and they’re wonderfully comfy and whimsical, in keeping with the current supercomfy-yet-kindadressy trend that seems to have taken hold. While this pattern does lend itself to girls’ pants, I made it into a pair of sweatpants that look great on Elliot, and I can see it in a linen blend as warm-weather pants for boys.

You can take a look at the Parsley Pants and Moon Pants pattern info pages for size charts and ideas, and don’t forget to peruse my tutorials for all my free tips and tricks! Here are just a few:

Tuxedo Stripe Tutorial
Kneepads – 3 ways
Sweatpants with a drawstring

(Did you know that each of my patterns has an info page dedicated to it here on the blog? All you have to do is type “made-by-rae.com/____” into your browser and fill in the blank with the pattern name. There you’ll find photos, size and yardage charts, a link to the shop to purchase the PDF, and thumbnails and links to all the blog posts related to that pattern. For example: Washi,Beatrix… etc. Everything relating to that pattern in one place.)

Yay for all the pants! Get inspiration and share photos on the following platforms:
Moon Pants Flickr Pool#moonpantspattern on Instagram
Parsley Pants Flickr Pool / #parsleypants on Instagram

Sweatpants with a drawstring (+ a how-to)

Now that the weather is cooling off I thought I’d post these sweatpants I made for Elliot from my Moon Pants sewing pattern. I added a drawstring (there’s a quick how-to at the end of this post) and made them out of some Birch fleece solid in shroom, which is a nice thick knit with a small amount of stretch. It was fun to take a pattern that usually reads “girl” and turn it into something boy-friendly!

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They ended up a little too big for him because I made him a size 8. He’s a size 8 height-wise, but he’s really a size 6 width-wise. Next time I’ll try to make a hybrid of the two sizes (and maybe take pics for those of you who might need to blend two sizes for your own kiddo!). So they’re a little baggy, but that means he can grow into them!

At first he was pretty serious for the photos. And then the armpit farting started…

And more weirdness. I love this kid.

And then he wanted me to take pics of him jumping so he could see a good mid-air shot:

It’s really easy to add a drawstring to the Moon Pants! I like to add a partial drawstring to the front of the pants so that even when it’s tied, the back of the pants are still stretchy and they are easy to pull on and off. Here’s a quick tutorial (by the way, this works great for both my Parsley Pants or my Moon Pants sewing patterns, as well as any other pattern with an elastic waist)!

Step 1: Add interfacing inside the waistband

Before you add the waistband, fold the waistband allowance down and press it to make a crease where the top of the waistband will be. Then add a small square of fusible interfacing to the inside of the waistband at the front center seam. Take a marking pen and make two lines for the drawstring holes. You’ll want those marks to be about the same width as your twill tape (my twill tape is 3/4″ wide), and about 1/2″ apart (1/4″ away from the center seam on either side).

Step 2: Sew buttonholes

Use your sewing machine to make buttonholes where your marks are. Then open the buttonholes with a seam ripper or small scissors.

Step 3: Add drawstrings and close elastic loop

Cut two 12-18″ lengths of twill tape and stitch them to the inside of the waistband at the sides. The exact length will depend on the size pant you’re using, so do a test tie with the ends to make sure they’re long enough, then trim to the desired length. Fold the ends under and stitch them down so they won’t fray. Cut your waistband elastic to the desired length, overlap the ends, and stitch them together to form an elastic loop.

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Here’s a closeup of the sides; you can see I folded the ends under before stitching them down.

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Step 4: Thread drawstring through holes and close up the waistband

Next, thread the ends of the twill tape through the holes:

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Finally, slide the elastic loop over the top of the pant, fold the waistband over the elastic, and stitch the bottom edge of the waistband in place. This is not shown, but imagine the elastic loop shown above sliding over the entire top of the pant, and then folding the waistband down over top of that to enclose it. Sliding the elastic a little as you go will prevent bunching. Alternatively you could also leave an opening in the back of the waistband and thread the elastic through, as shown in the pattern. Either way will work!

Moon Sweatpants

Part of the fun of making a new pattern is pushing the envelope with fabric choices to see how versatile it can be. Originally I envisioned more flowy, lightweight fabrics for my most recent pattern — Moon Pants — but it works surprisingly well when sewn up in a sweatshirt fleece, as you can see. I’d say it’s a win. They’re baggy sweats, to be sure, but I think they’re pretty cute, don’t you?

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It might seem somewhat unseasonal to post sweatpants in May, but the weather here in Michigan has been so. crazy…cold one day, hot the next. Case in point: yesterday it was 80, and today it’s 50. So these are very much in Clementine’s wardrobe rotation yet, and if this summer is anything like last summer they will get a ton of use. I also made a pair for Elliot in solid sweatshirt fleece (without the moon pockets, but with a drawstring). More on that soon I hope!

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Signs of spring

Another pair of Moon Pants, in a light cotton voile perfect for spring.

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My Moon Pants Sewing Pattern is fun, quick and easy to sew, all new, and IN THE SHOP!

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We’ve just arrived in Seattle for spring break, which is all green and in bloom so it feels like we’ve gone from winter to spring in just a matter of hours. Clementine packed these for the trip, though I doubt she plans to pair it with something as unimaginative as the white Flashback Tee shown here.

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I put a little piece of interfacing on the inside of the pant leg at the top of the moon pocket, to make sure that those points are nice and strong (we included this hint in the pattern too of course).

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Guess what she’s singing here. No really, you get one guess.

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Have a Happy Easter, everyone!!!

Moon Pants Sewing Pattern is here!

Made By Rae moon pants sewing pattern

I’m so excited to announce that my latest sewing pattern is here, Moon Pants! These pants are fun and playful and modern, as well as super easy and quick to sew. The fit is roomy so they’re both comfortable AND stylish. The pattern features a basic beginner option (View A) which has a basic elastic waistband and elastic cuffs, and a slightly more advanced option (View B) featuring the adorable crescent moon-shaped pockets and a flat cuff over a gathered hem.

Made By Rae Moon Pants - Views A and B

Moon Pants work great in light or flowy woven fabrics as a harem-style pant for the warmer months. In cooler weather, Moon Pants are perfect for a pair of sweats or knit pants when sewn out of medium or heavy weight knits.

The Moon Pants in all of the photos on this page were sewn out of the amazing Bespoke Double Gauze from Cotton+Steel Fabrics.

For ALL of the pattern info, including yardage chart, fabric recommendations, size charts, photos, and finished measurements, please check out my Moon Pants Shop Page and click on the three tabs (description, materials, more).

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So far I’ve only made pairs for girls, but I really think a pair of sweats or even a linen version (see this boy moon pant inspiration pic) would be fantastic for boys!! What do you think?

This digital sewing pattern (PDF) includes:

  • eight sizes from 3 to 12
  • thorough step-by-step instructions with diagrams, full-color photographs, and plenty of tips and hints.
  • full-sized pattern pieces including seam allowances.

BUY NOW

I hope you love this pattern as much as I do, and I can’t wait to see all the Moon Pants you make! Happy Sewing!!!

Share your photos:
#moonpantspattern and #madebyrae on Instagram and Twitter / Moon Pants Pattern Flickr Pool.

moon pant slide shop

 

Moon Pants Sewing Pattern update

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Every time we work on a new pattern I think “That one won’t take long!” and then…it always does. Every time. Not for any particular reason, though the fact that Elli and I both had babies last year and so now we each only work about 10 hours a week is probably the biggest factor. A ton of tiny details go into making a good sewing pattern, even a simple one, so it always ends up looking easier than it is. So as a way of updating you on our progress, I thought I’d post a bunch of photos of our almost-here-Moon-Pants! Here’s Clementine in her Moon Pants with a couple of different Flashback Tees:

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I bribed Clementine with a lollipop last weekend to get her to pose for the camera in her moon pants again (see Stylo posts 1 / 2 / 3) and she really rocked it. She went all out. It definitely helped that I put Let It Go on the stereo full blast. And even though I told her she only needed to wear them with t-shirts (so the waistband would be easily visible in the photos), she insisted on putting on ALL THE OUTFITS, including the Pierrot and Charlie Tunics that match. Which is of course in my head is how I always imagine they will be worn, like a fun complementary mix-and-matchy wardrobe. So there was this outfit:

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and this one:

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I love these pants paired with sandals for spring or summer. And red is always fun, especially when it doesn’t exactly match.

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When will the pattern be ready? Elli is almost finished with the final layout and I’ve just finished sewing the final check-everything-over samples (here’s a peek at one in voile), so I’m shooting for an April 1 launch. Cross your fingers and your eyeballs and maybe it will be even sooner! And now I’m sad that I didn’t include a photo of Clementine with her eyes crossed, because whenever a camera is aimed at Clementine there is ALWAYS a photo of her with her eyes crossed. I want to hit POST instead of going and looking for one, so you’ll just have to wait. OH WEELLLL!!!

Mochi Geranium Dress for Stylo

Mochi geranium dress

This is the third in a series of posts detailing the outfits I made using Cotton and Steel fabrics for Stylo Magazine last fall (see the previous posts here and here). This outfit features a Geranium Dress made with a cotton from Rashida Coleman-Hale’s new Mochi line, the Moon Pants made with Bespoke double gauze (previously seen in this post), and a gold pom-pom headband. Both Mochi and Bespoke are Cotton and Steel lines currently available in fabric shops.

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For me to even consider doing such a large project within the first year of having a baby, I knew I would need to do a significant amount of planning. So I’d like to talk about what it takes to get a project like this off the ground. If I didn’t know anything about the project I might have guessed that the photoshoot itself probably took the most work, but I personally think the shoot is the easiest and most fun part. It’s the planning that can really kill ya, in my opinion.

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Perhaps it will surprise you to know that this project began last summer (or maybe not?). Here’s a brief timeline for the project:

June: Discuss with Stylo possible contribution to Fall issue
July: Correspond with Cotton and Steel to ask about possible collaboration
August: Cotton and Steel sends Fall 2014 samples, select and photograph samples, plan fabric/garment combinations
September: Fabric arrives, commence actual SEWING (six garments, three headbands), photo shoot, Edit photos, deliver photos to Stylo
November 3: Stylo Issue 3 release

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I decided to do the spread because I knew it would be a great way to promote my children’s sewing patterns in a highly visual way, while at the same time producing a cohesive set of clothing samples that could then be used later to promote the patterns in other ways. I love the way that a magazine, digital or print, can really produce a stunning visual presentation, and Jess and Celina do it really well with Stylo. The next question was: which fabrics? Initially I thought I might use Lotus Pond, but as the magazine was set to release in late fall, the summery cotton prints would have been amazing but a bit out of season. My next thought was Cotton and Steel, because they’ve made an attempt to create cohesive collections that are printed not just on quilting fabrics, but on other garment-friendly fabrics as well, making it easy to create outfits for children that coordinate (a pair of canvas pants worn with a cotton gauze shirt, for instance). That is something I’m pretty sure is unique to Cotton and Steel, by the way; no other company that I know of does that, though most fabric companies do offer unique lines on their various substrates.

Mochi Geranium Dress

I initially asked Melody Miller, the founding designer of Cotton and Steel, about using their Spring 2014 fabrics, but at that point they already had samples for their Fall fabrics so she suggested that I might like to try those instead, which were to include one of my very favorite fabrics, DOUBLE GAUZE (EEK!). It was definitely hard to keep the whole thing on the hush-hush until the fabrics debuted at Fall Quilt Market. Another bonus: because the deadline for the magazine was nearly a month before Quilt Market, the samples could also be used for the Cotton and Steel booth.

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One more thing: I did very little of the sewing for this project. Karen and my assistant Tashina did most of it. I did some of the cutting (that double gauze can be tricky!) and I did some of the sewing and all of the hand-stitching for the Charlie Tunic (see this post), but mostly I just hovered at the studio with a baby on my hip.

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Anyway, the dress is Clementine’s favorite of all of the things we made for this project; she even wore it for school picture day (and it would have shown up in the photo if she had taken off the sweater she wore over it *facepalm*). I also want to highlight a couple of the other accessories because she really enjoyed those as well: the gold tattoos were designed by Rifle Paper company for Tattly, and the sparkly TOMS I found at Bivouac in downtown Ann Arbor by my studio. Both were instant hits with my girl who is pretty fond of sparkly things.

Pierrot and Moon Pants for Stylo

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Let’s take a look at another outfit I designed for Stylo Magazine using the Cotton+Steel Bespoke Double Gauzes! (I blogged about the first outfit in this post).

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This fetching ensemble is comprised of a Pierrot Tunic, Moon Pants (a pattern-in-progress…for more information, see this post) and a headband made of double-gauze blossoms. This is a slightly different version from the first pair of Moon Pants in that the cuff is separate and there is a beautiful crescent moon-shaped pocket.

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If I had to pick an outfit as my absolute favorite of the four I created for the Stylo spread, it would be this one. Which is funny because it started out being my least favorite, mainly because I couldn’t really get either of the garments to photograph very well when I took the initial flat “still-life” photos. Pierrot is oversized so when you lay it out on a table — let me be honest — it’s not at its best. But as soon you put it on your kids it’s Instant Cute. So when Clementine put them on they really sprung to life and I ended up LOVING it. The double gauze just creates a beautiful drape when the clothing is worn that you can’t capture when it’s on the hanger. And the tiny stars on these prints are really, really gorgeous.

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Here’s a closeup of the double gauze ruffle on the Pierrot Tunic — when you cut the double gauze on the bias and stitch with a zig zag along the edges, it creates an amazing texture. After making the ruffle on the tunic, I decided to take more strips and turn them into the flowers for the headband. I’ll try to figure out a way to post more about the headband because it’s pretty cool: I made it with a strip of velcro on top and then put velcro strips on the bottom of each of the flowers so you can move them around and mix and match the colors!

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Clementine rocked this outfit. Clearly.

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She’s wearing this outfit with a sherpa vest from Mini Boden that coincidentally had stars on the lining too. Perfect!

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To see the entire spread, complete with the three other outfits I designed, follow this link: Stylo Issue 3 (my spread starts on page 99)!! You can see the entire collection of Bespoke Double Gauzes over at the Cotton and Steel website (they ship early next year). And of course, the Pierrot Tunic Sewing Pattern is available as a PDF download in my pattern shop.

Striped Double Gauze Outfit for Stylo

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I want to walk you through each of the four Cotton + Steel outfits I designed for the latest issue of Stylo in a bit more detail here on the blog, starting with this one:

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The garments in this outfit were made with Bespoke Double Gauze, part of the Fall 2014 Cotton+Steel lineup that will be in shops early next year. I was looking for something new and different to feature my patterns in the Stylo spread, so when I contacted Melody Miller to ask about using Cotton+Steel garment fabrics for the shoot, I was thrilled to hear they were going to have a line of double gauzes. I believe I have mentioned in the past that wearing double gauze is like wearing pajamas. I selected a couple of quilting cotton fabrics for the shoot as well, but the double gauzes are definitely the main attraction here, and I love how they worked with my patterns.

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Charlie Tunic with handstitching

I’d never made a Charlie Tunic out of double gauze before, but now I’m wondering if I’ll ever sew it out of anything else. Making this one made me fall in love all over again with the Charlie pattern. It’s so comfortable and cute, especially when sewn out of a fabric so soft and easy to wear. Since I designed the pattern a few years ago, I’ve noticed that I’ve started streamlining the construction a bit by using just one button loop, skipping the side vents, and flattening the bottom of the front placket which makes for a more minimal, modern look. In addition, this version features the neckline placket on the inside instead of the outside, so the Purl Cotton stitches which hold the edges of the placket in place became the visual interest of this piece.

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Moon Pants

I originally intended just to make a few pairs of Parsley Pants to coordinate with everything, because that pattern is just so gosh-darned versatile. But as soon as I had the double gauze in hand, I wanted to design something more dramatic, less practical, and so the these harem pants were born. I’m so excited about how these turned out, and how much Clementine loves them — they are super comfortable and roomy. I made two versions of these pants for the shoot; the other one has a separate cuff and a pocket shaped like a crescent moon (I’ll show you those soon!!), so that’s where the name “Moon Pants” came from. For those of you who love to hack patterns, I’m not gonna lie, you could definitely hack Parsley or any other basic pant pattern for that matter to create this style by adding width, cuffs or elastic casings. But I’m starting to realize the value of offering a new pattern ready-made, and so I’m planning this for my next children’s pattern release. I’ve realized that many people (including myself, often) just don’t have the time or patience to figure out modifications for everything, so I hope there will be people who will appreciate this new pattern.

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Headband

This headband was a rectangle of double gauze, sewed together along one long side and then turned right-side out. Then I tucked the ends in and pleated them around a strip of fold-over elastic, which I top-stitched in place. Voila, new headband to match! I have to say, it makes me want to cry a little at how BIG Clementine looks with her hair pulled back. Waaaaaaah!! Where is my little baby girl!??!

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OK! That’s it for this outfit — feel free to post any questions you might have to comments and I’ll try to answer them all. You can see the entire spread, complete with the other outfits I designed, in Stylo Issue 3 (my spread starts on page 99)!! Thank you so much to Tashina and Karen for their help sewing up these looks, and to Jess and Celina for their amazing work on this issue!

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