Converting Washi to a nursing top

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Over here at MBR Labs, I’ve been working on hacking the Washi Dress pattern so that it works as a nursing top! I’ve had plenty of requests for this since the original pattern was released, but I really wanted to wait until the Washi Expansion Pack came because I knew the front center seam on the bow versions would be PERFECT for adding a zipper or buttons or something to the bodice. What can I say, I lurrrrve the bow. I think it looks really great.

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I was also surprised to discover that these tops actually fit over my belly, even at 36 weeks of pregnancy, though if you want Washi to fit throughout the entire pregnancy, I’d definitely recommend cutting the skirt pieces a few inches wider along the “dress” line instead of the “top” line as I could have used just a few more inches in that region. Of course the intention was not really to make a maternity top, so it’s not a big deal…just thought I’d mention it.

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I’m so pregnant I don’t even edit out my weird expressions anymore. Vanity has gone OUT THE WINDOW. You’re welcome.

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For these two versions, I tried two different kinds of zippers. On this reversible double gauze version I put in a regular old zipper:

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And on this voile version there is an invisible zipper.

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Pretty nice eh? I definitely like the invisible zip better as far as overall look, but I’ll give you a quick step-by-step for both.

Just a few things before we start:

  • I used 9″ and 14″ zippers and just trimmed the bottom of the zipper to be even with the bodice, but I think a 7″ zipper might work too.
  • The “Bow Bodice” pattern pieces I used in this tutorial can be found in the Washi Expansion pack, but you could also just add 1/2″ to the center fold line on the original Washi bodice piece, and cut two instead of one on the fold to create a front center seam. The “dot” on the pattern piece is 1.5″ below the top.
  • You may also want to go up a size on the bodice piece from your normal size, as you may need more room in front when you are nursing!
  • When I make the bow tops, I also like to scoop out the bottom of the front neckline 1″ and lower the dot accordingly, so I did that before I started. Personally I think it looks nicer when the neckline is a bit lower with the bow, but it hits everyone in a different place depending on how you’re built, so…maybe hold it up to your body before you start trimming away.
  • One last thing I did differently for both of these bodices was leave the fabric inside the darts (instead of cutting out the “V” shape from the middle of the darts) because with double gauze and voile, the fabric tends to fray and I didn’t want to leave those dart seam allowances as short as the pattern calls for. You can see this in the first photo below.

Let’s start with the regular zipper!

ADDING A ZIPPER TO WASHI

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Step 1: Baste the two front bow bodice pieces* together along the front center seam as directed in the pattern from bottom to the dot and trim the seam allowance to the width of your zipper (most standard zips are 1/2″ wide on each side, so I trimmed the seam allowance to 1/2″).

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Step 2: Place the closed zipper face down towards the basted center front seam, so that the teeth are directly over the seam, and pin in place (or use Wonder Tape to hold your zipper in place). The head of the zipper should be right where the top of the center seam ends. Sew each side of the zipper tape right down the center using a zipper foot (put the needle down and slide the head of the zipper around when you start to get close to it, to keep it out of the way of the presser foot). When you get to the bottom of the bodice, sew across the teeth back and forth a few times so that the zipper head won’t fall off the zipper when you trim the bottom of the zipper away. From the front it should now look like this:

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Step 3: Remove the basting stitches with a seam ripper from the outside of the bodice. Then finish the seam by either serging the edge of the zipper tape to the edge of the seam allowance on both sides (shown), or zig zag stitching or overlocking the edges together on a regular sewing machine. This is especially important if you have a fabric that frays easily!

Next step is to trim the bottom of the zipper off so that it’s even with the bottom of the bodice, and then continue to construct the top as instructed in the pattern. Sew the darts, pleat the front skirt, etc, just as you would if you were using the normal bodice. You’ll notice that the front center seam will need to be pressed down instead of up, but that’s really the only difference!

ADDING AN INVISIBLE ZIPPER TO WASHI

For this version, you may want to refer to Colette’s Invisible Zipper tutorial or Invisible Zip Video; I found it helpful. And honestly I didn’t include a ton of detail here, so you probably will too!

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Step 1: With the tip of your iron, press the zipper teeth away from the zipper tape. This will make it easier to sew because the teeth usually curl around the tape a bit.

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Step 2: Open the zipper. With the bodice piece face up and the zipper face down, pin one side of the zipper to its corresponding bodice front, with the zipper teeth where the seam will be. I started with the right side of the zipper and the right bodice piece. See how it looks kind of backwards in the photo? Just trust me on this one. I pressed a crease where the front center seam would be before I started to help me visualize where the zipper teeth should go, but you could also draw it in with a marking pen.

Again, align the top of the zipper so that when it’s closed, the head of the zipper will be where the dot is on the pattern piece.

Step 3: Now sew the zipper and bodice together (still with the zipper open), stitching right next to the zipper teeth. I use a regular presser foot for this, but if you have an invisible zipper foot for your machine, that will work too. Then pin the other side of the zipper to the other bodice piece, and repeat what you just did. Sew across the bottom of the bodice a few times to create a stop for the zipper head.

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In the two photos here (above and below) you can see what it should look like after you’ve sewn both sides (the zipper is closed now). See the little white threads sticking out at the top and bottom in the photo above? You can’t see the stitches because they’re RIGHT next to the teeth, but they’re there!

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Step 4: Now construct the rest of the top as instructed. As you can see I waited to trim the zipper off until after I attached the bodice to the front skirt.

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So there you go! Let me know how it turns out for you if you try it.

One last thing: if you fear sewing the zipper you could also try adding a couple extra inches to the front center seam allowances and folding them over to make an overlapping button placket type thingy; I’ve seen this done a few times successfully, so that may also be worth a try. Have fun!!!

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Washi Dress Expansion Pack is Here!

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When the original Washi Dress Sewing Pattern was released over a year ago in August 2012, I was blown away by the response to the pattern. BLOWN. AWAY. Washi was the first women’s pattern I ever released, with the idea that I wanted to produce a flattering dress pattern for women that would work with cottons and not just apparel fabrics. I had no idea so many people would like it. I still sometimes have to pinch myself over how many of you have purchased the pattern, how many Washis have been made and are being worn out there, and how great it looks on so many different figures! I really have to give you, dear readers, credit for pushing me to put it out there in the first place. Your feedback and encouragement fueled my decision to go for it, and this is really going to sound cheesy, but I don’t think I would have done it without you.

When I started making variations on Washi last year that included sleeves and collars and bows and linings (see below for a roundup of all of them), you asked for those too. The patterns I work on have always been driven by reader demand — I mean, why spend time working on anything other than the ones you guys are crazy about? — so I’m happy to finally be able to say that the long-awaited Washi Expansion Pack is NOW AVAILABLE as a separate add-on so you can create so many more great options with your original pattern!!! Woot woot! *does Kermit Arms*

The Washi Expansion Pack is a PDF SUPPLEMENT to the original Washi Dress pattern (which is currently available in six women’s sizes, in both PDF and print) and will allow you to make a number of new Washi variations using a combination of original pattern pieces and new expansion pack pattern pieces.

PLEASE READ THIS: This pack is not a stand-alone pattern, in other words, you will need both the expansion pack AND the original pattern to be able to create the looks included. You can also purchase them together HERE.

We’ve divided all of the new variation possibilities up into three views, all of which can be made as either a dress or tunic. Of course they can be combined as well; for instance, if you wanted the sleeve from View B and a big bow from View A. Here are the basic views included in the Expansion Pack:

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View A: A sleeveless variation with a big bow; this view features an easy back elastic casing for those who would prefer to skip the shirring in the original pattern.

In addition to the base yardage for the original Washi Dress (see size and yardage charts on the Washi Page), you will need:
• 1/2 yard additional yardage for the large bow pieces and armhole bias strips
• 1/2 yard of 1″- or 1.25″-wide elastic for back

For this view, I recommend that you select a fabric with a bit of structure, such as quilting cotton, a linen blend, or cotton voile/lawn. High-drape fabrics such as silk or rayon may produce a more shapeless result around the neckline, since the bow folds over itself around the neck to form a collar.

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View B: A sweet version with sleeves and little bow!

In addition to the base yardage for the original Washi Dress (see size and yardage charts on the Washi Page), you will need:
• 3/4 yard additional yardage for sleeves, bow facings and bow
• 1/4 yard (or small piece) lightweight fusible interfacing
• 2/3 yard 1/4″-wide elastic for sleeves (if you want a casing)
• elastic thread for shirring the sleeves (if you want your sleeves shirred at the cuff) and back

For this view, lightweight or high-drape fabrics such as silk, voile, lawn, 100% linen, or rayon work well, because of the gathered sleeve and skirt on this version. Fabrics with more structure won’t gather as nicely and will “stand up” more at the sleeve cap. If you do choose to make this version with a structured fabric, you may want to reduce the width of the sleeve by 1⁄2″ to 1″ at the fold to prevent the sleeve cap from looking too full at the top.

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View C: A Peter Pan collar version with optional pointed sleeves and two great collars to choose from. This view also includes pattern pieces and detailed instructions for a bodice lining (you can see videos on this technique here as well)!

In addition to the base yardage for the original Washi Dress (see size and yardage charts on the Washi Page), you will need:
• 1/2 yard additional yardage for collar and optional pointed cap sleeves
• 1 yard fabric for bodice linings (or less; size M and smaller may be able to fit the pieces side-by-side on 1/2 yard)
• 1/2 yard lightweight fusible interfacing
• 1/2 yard 1″ or 1.25″-wide elastic for back

For this view, I recommend that you select a medium weight fabric with a bit of structure for the collar, such as quilting cotton, a linen blend, or poplin. Lightweight or high-drape fabrics such as silk, voile, lawn, 100% linen, or rayon may make it harder to get a nicely shaped collar. The collar is designed to roll a bit at the neckline, rather than sit completely flat against the dress, so structure helps.

The 49-page Expansion Pack eBook Includes:

  • full-sized pattern pieces for linings, bows, collars, and two different sleeves, as well as an adapted bodice piece (with different armholes for sleeveless or sleeves, and a new front center seam that could potentially be adapted for nursing!)
  • 26 pages of rock solid full-color instructions along with plenty of tips and hints
  • a special two-page “Seam Finishes Appendix” with instructions for my favorite seam finishes

One of the best things this pattern pack has to offer is clear, step-by-step instructions on how to add all of these new features to your Washi Dress. While the original pattern was intended for confident beginners, it’s safe to say that the techniques in the expansion pack are intermediate to advanced, but I think you’ll find enough here to help hold your hand through the entire process. And of course, you know how to reach me if you ever need to email with a question!

OK, are you ready for Washi XP?!?!

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Washi Dress Expansion Pack PDF (does not include original pattern)

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And now for more Washi XP inspiration!

I’ve featured all of the variations available in this expansion pack in the past on my blog along with a few others that are similar. Here are the versions I’ve made, along with a few notes, so you can make each one for yourself:

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Top Row:
Pale Pink Linen Top – this features the curved peterpan collar of View C, with the addition of an extra pleat in the bodice (pleat not included in the expansion pack).
Time for Tea Dress – View C from the expansion pack, with curved collar and no sleeve.
Liberty Tie Top – a tunic featuring the big bow and bias bound armholes from View A. The bow piece has been shortened just to tie in a knot.

Middle Row:
Tsuru Washi with a Bow – View A from the expansion pack
Hello Pilgrim! – this dress pre-dated the Washi Dress, but a similar look may be achieved by using a shortened big bow from View A and the cap sleeve from the original Washi Dress pattern, or the pointed cap sleeves of View C in the expansion pack.
Ruby Star Washi Dress – this was the first Washi Dress I made with sleeves; this link provides a tutorial with a free pattern piece for a full sleeve; please note that the sleeve in View B of the Expansion Pack is narrower and has a more tailored fit than the sleeve I used for my Ruby Star Washi.

Bottom Row:
Another Washi Dress with a Big Bow – features the big bow of View A and the sleeves from View B in a dress version.
Pink Washi Top with a Little Bow – View B from the expansion pack
Bird Dress with Pointed Collar and Sleeve – View C from the expansion pack, with pointed collar and sleeve.

Be sure to check out all of the lovely Washi Dresses in the Flickr pool, and add your own photos too!

Made by Rae - Washi TunicWashi Dress 1Washi Dress 1Washi, London CallingWashi DressWashi Dress

I hope you will enjoy this new expansion pack and have a ton of fun with it! I hope to do a tutorial specific to the collar (View C) very soon, but let me know if you have other Washi-XP-related requests. Enjoy!!!

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Another Washi Dress with a big bow

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I think the title pretty much sums it up. This is a Washi Dress that I made last winter, but I just added sleeves to it last week (it had a ruffle around the armhole that was really not working, just trust me on this one). I like the deeper colors of this striped voile for fall, and adding a sleeve makes it even more fall-esque. Perfect for leggings and boots with a big gray cable knit sweater (note to self: purchase gray cable knit sweater). This voile is part of Anna Maria Horner’s Innocent Crush fabric line.

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This bow is in fact even wider than the bow that will come with the soon-to-be-released Washi Expansion Pack (more details on that in this post); the voile was so lightweight that I thought I’d push the limit a bit and see how wide I could get away with. The result is very fun, if you like a big bow. Do you think this is TOO big for a big bow? I don’t think we have quite reached that point yet, but then again I’m always one for a big statement. For contrast, see this post for the “standard” big bow width I chose for the expansion pack.

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I’ll be heading out to Texas at the end of this week for Quilt Market and a visit to my sister Elli of course, so now it’s time to decide which of my Washi Dresses to pack. Or figure what else I should try and make last-minute before I go! Should be fun.

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Bird Dress with pointed collar and sleeve

After the response to yesterday’s pink Washi top (wow!!) I’m not sure I can follow it up with anything better, but hopefully you’ll love this dress as much as I do!

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One of my favorite prints from the recently-released Waterfront Park line from Violet Craft was this elegantly simple bird print. My friend April gifted me with this fabric when I visited Sew to Speak in Columbus this summer so I’m happy I got a chance to make something fantastic with it!!

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This dress is the Washi Dress of course, with the addition of a pointed collar and a new sleeve, both of which will be pattern pieces included in the new Washi Expansion Pack (which I talked about more in yesterday’s post).

I love the pointed Peter Pan collars that seem to be everywhere lately. I wanted a small sleeve that would really go well with the pointed collar, and the answer is clearly a pointed sleeve. I also know that many of you loved the Hello Pilgrim dress that I posted a long time ago, and I feel like this pointed sleeve would also look really fantastic with a big bow and recreate that look quite nicely. My first version of this dress had both a black collar AND black sleeves, but it was crazy I tell you. I tried it on for Mr Rae and my first thought was “this is way too Minnie Mouse, isn’t it?” and he was like, “yup.” I still think making a version where the collar and the sleeves are the same fabric would be great, it just didn’t work this time.

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The collar is easily finished with a bodice lining, so instead of using shirring in the back on this one, I used the bottom of the lining in the back to create an elastic casing, which I think will be really nice for those of you who fear shirring with elastic thread. I used elastic in the back of the Motif Madness Dress and the Time for Tea dress, and it works really nicely.

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What do you think? Do you like the pointed collars? I’m including both curved and pointed Peter Pan collars in the Washi Expansion pack, so that should be really fun!! Can’t wait until it’s ready!

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Pink Washi top with a little bow

It’s time for me to start blogging about some of the clothes I’ve been making for me!! A bit of a backup over here; seems like the sewing is happening faster than the blogging over here these days. That’s good though…I like to sew, if you hadn’t noticed.

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First up is this Washi top, which has been completely transformed to the point that it doesn’t even resemble the original Washi Dress much, does it? I think the main difference is that it’s made with rayon, a fabric which behaves SO differently from quilting cotton or voile that it gives the pattern a whole new look. I talk about rayons more in this post, and I’ve been sewing with cotton rayon a ton lately (here and here)…it’s becoming one of my absolute favorite fabrics to sew with.

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As you can see I also added a sleeve (which I shirred at the ends, see this post for a shirring tutorial), gathered the skirt instead of pleating it, and added this fetching little bow. Eagle-eyed readers will noticed that this sleeve is *not* the same as the free Washi sleeve (found here); while it’s still gathered and similar in length, I made a new, more tailored pattern piece for this one, since I was hearing the words “Little House on the Prairie” and “pilgrim” associated with the other fuller one. Not that that is a bad thing; just thought I would try to make a new sleeve that was more tailored and flattering.

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I know I’ve been hinting at a Washi Expansion pattern pack for a long time now, but I promise you that it is truly in the works right now, full steam, along with Josephine (that received such an enthusiastic response a few weeks ago, thank you!!!). The expansion pack will most definitely include this sleeve, a big bow (see this post), bodice lining pattern pieces and instructions, another short sleeve (will post about that one soon), and a couple of Peter Pan collars in both curved and pointed styles. If you like *this* little bow, I will seriously consider adding these pattern pieces as well. What do you think?

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The Washi Expansion Pack is shaping up to be quite a big project over here, but I’m really excited about it because it will allow someone to really make a TON of fun washi variations using the basic Washi pattern as a building block. That is exactly the kind of sewing I love to do, and I know many of you love to sew that way too! Can’t wait to show you even more of my latest variations!!!

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Summer Washi roundup

Let’s do a little dive into the Washi Dress photo pool, shall we? We are just a week shy of my Washi Dress Pattern’s first birthday! I love wearing my Washis, and it thrills me to see how many of you wear yours, too.  I never could have imagined the proliferation of this pattern. What lovely specimens you have all created!!

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Jemellia blogged about her closetful of Washis (above) here. She decided to sew a Washi every day for a week. CAN YOU BELIEVE IT??? I am totally amazed.

Washi Dress V1

Check out Megan’s first Washi! Love the paisley print.

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Above: Left, Right.

summer washi 2

Above: Top Left, Top Right (and Venus posted a little photo montage of a Washi Robot Dance here).

Bottom Left, Bottom Right.

As it happens, Washi makes a stunning maternity dress!

Washi Dress #2

Katie blogged about hers (above) here. And now for a couple of others:

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Above: Left, Right.

While this pattern is always a great excuse to wear some wild-n-crazy prints, sometimes it’s nice to tone it down a bit with solid colors and color blocks.

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Above: Left, Middle, Right.

Sometimes when you start making Washi Dresses, you just can’t stop. This person is clearly addicted:

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photo via

I love this maxi version of the dress:

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photo via

Just a few more to wrap up our roundup:

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Above: Top Left, Top Right. Bottom Left, Bottom Right.

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Above: Left, Right (hello, what fun!).

This is really just the tip of the iceberg. I wish I could show them all, but I can’t!!! You’ll just have to click over to the Washi Flickr Pool so you can ooh and aah over them for yourself!

Made by Rae - Washi TunicWashi Dress 1Washi Dress 1Washi, London CallingWashi DressWashi DressWashi Dress Kleid Vintage türkis Polkadots with BeltWashi Tunic.Sleeve.Washi Dress in ChambrayMy First WashiTib Washi

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Tsuru Washi with a bow

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I made this fun Washi Dress for Quilt Market this spring with one of the “Motif Madness” prints from the Tsuru line designed by my friend Rashida for Cloud 9.

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The ties got stuck inside the dress the first time I put it on, and when I started to pull them out they made a fun little origami-esque collar…gotta love those happy accidents. I actually wear it that way most of the time now, but I pulled out the ties for these photos so you could see how it’s *supposed* to look! Do you think it looks better tucked in or tied out?

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I used a wide piece of elastic in the back instead of the elastic shirring that the pattern usually calls for. This is a nice option for those of you who Fear the Shir. The other thing I did differently on this version was bind the armholes so that the bias tape shows on the outside of the armhole (in the pattern, the bias tape is put on the inside of the armhole so it doesn’t show on the outside).

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I’ve hinted in the past that I’m working on an expansion pack for the Washi Dress that includes a tie-neck option. I’m not certain when the extra options will be available, but it’s on “The List”…I just work at my own special pace, which is a slow and steady one. With two small kids, I really don’t see any other way, and that’s fine by me.

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I heard a rumor that the Tsuru fabrics will be shipping to shops again in the next month or so, so you should be able to find these fabrics again very soon! You may also remember the Motif Madness Geranium Dresses that I posted earlier this year. Clementine’s big into matching mama right now, so she keeps asking for HER dress that looks like this (meaning the red one), but since that was a Quilt Market sample (and they all got shipped back to Cloud 9) I think I’m going to make her another one. I guess I would have thought that was pretty lame in my 20’s, but now I just think it’s cute that she wants to dress like me. We even wore our matching Washi Dresses to the Toledo Zoo last Friday. It was part embarrassing, part adorable…but she loved it, so that made it totally worth it! What’s your take on matchy-matchy? Would you do it??

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Also: I was totally into wearing my dresses with skinny jeans this spring. It’s been SO COLD!! I’m thrilled that it’s finally looking a little more like summer here in Michigan!

Want to see what everyone else is making with the Washi Dress pattern? Check out the Washi Dress pool. You’ll be amazed!

Made by Rae - Washi TunicWashi Dress 1Washi Dress 1Washi, London CallingWashi DressWashi DressWashi Dress Kleid Vintage türkis Polkadots with BeltWashi Tunic.Sleeve.Washi Dress in ChambrayMy First WashiTib Washi

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On the Twelfth Day of Christmas [NOW CLOSED]

This giveaway is now closed. This is our last 12 Days of Christmas Giveaway, thanks to everyone for participating!

On the twelfth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me… twelve ugly sweaters, twelve drummers drumming, eleven pipers piping, ten lords-a-leaping, nine ladies dancing, eight maids-a-milking, seven swans-a-swimming, six geese-a-laying, five golden rings, four colly birds, three French hens, two turtle doves and a partridge in a pear tree!

…and Rae gave to me…wait! what! Did you see how I snuck in an extra twelve up there? Well that was what we call foreshadowing, because today there will be TWO winners! Your odds are twice as good today chez Made By Rae because…

…on the twelfth day of Christmas, Rae gave to me a Washi Dress Sewing Pattern!

Washi Sewing Pattern

There will be two winners today:

  • one winner will receive a PDF version of the pattern by email
  • one winner will receive the newly-minted print version of the pattern by good old snail mail.

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This patten is so versatile: it adapts well to tunic-length or maxi-length, it looks great with longer sleeves, and if you pair it with tights and boots and layer with a cardigan, it’s an all-seasons dress!

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Above: 1. Washi Tunic, 2. Washi with Waist Tie, 3. With Green Cardi, 4. With White Cardi

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Above Top, Left to Right: 1. Denim Washi, 2. Washi Dress in Dear Stella Gilt Trip, 3. Washi Dress; Bottom, Left to Right: 4. Blue Washi Tunic, 5. Upcycled Washi Dress, 6. nani IRO Washi

All photos in the collections above were taken from the Washi Dress Photo Pool on Flickr, where you will see how hard it was to decide which lovely renditions to feature in the post.

Twelve Days of Christmas

Leave one comment on this post before 9 pm EST tonight for your chance to win this sewing pattern. The winners will be contacted via email, and will receive either a PDF *or* print copy of the Washi Dress Sewing Pattern. Both winners will be randomly selected; we will assign each prize to each winner (so be OK with either prize before you enter, m’kay?). Void where prohibited by law.

Well, folks, it’s been fun!  We’ll post a list of our winners sometime next week. Thanks for helping me extend the festivities this year with these giveaways!!

Washi Dress Sewing Pattern is now in print!

I am like a proud mother hen, y’all.

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I can’t take much of the credit though; Elli reformatted the original digital layout for print, Lauren designed the cover, and Jessica did just about everything else required to ship these out to all the shops that wanted them: taking orders, emailing shops, sending invoices, and so on. I made Jessica put “Director of Print Operations” on her email signature. Ostentatious titles amuse me.

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There are two full-sized one-sided pattern sheets, so you can either trace or GASP! cut your pieces out (I never cut into my pattern pages — see this post for an overview of my sewing process — but you do what you have to do).

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The instructions are also on one big sheet (don’t they look awesome, by the way? That’s Elli, my Digitizing Queen). This was a selfish decision, really; when I sew I like to have everything out there, where I can see it, instead of having to flip through pages in a booklet. Just my personal preference. You want to know my trick? Instead of laying it out on the table where it gets in the way, I hang the whole page up on the sewing room wall with a few pieces of washi tape, like this! Handy.

washi instructions on wall

If you would like to own your very own copy of this limited-edition print pattern, click here to see a list of the shops who have it in stock:

We are also still taking wholesale orders from brick and mortar shops and webstores who are interested in carrying the pattern, so email Jessica if your shop is interested in carrying these.

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