Creativebug Outfit for Hugo

Sewing for little ones set / Creativebug + Made By Rae

I have always felt that the two most essential garments in a child’s wardrobe are a basic pair of pants and a tee shirt. It was on this premise that I designed my two children’s patterns, the Flashback Tee for knits and the Parsley Pants for woven fabrics, and it’s also the reason that my Sewing for Little Ones series on Creativebug begins with how to make basic pants and ends with how to make a Trace-and-Make tee.  I love being able to whip up a tee and pants for my own kiddos; it’s such a fun and gratifying thing to sew an easy outfit in an afternoon (also: Elliot, at 9, still prefers my “soft pants” to store-bought).

Sewing for little ones set / Creativebug + Made By Rae

I made this little outfit for Hugo when I was writing my outlines for the Creativebug classes, and as you can see, the result is completely wearable and cute. I used the dog print from my Small World corduroy fabric line for the pants, and that soft yellow knit (I swear this is the PERFECT shade of yellow) is from Cloud9’s knit solids collection. Cloud9 provided ALL of the fabrics I used to teach the classes, by the way; I’m partial to their fabrics, as you probably already know.

Sewing for little ones set / Creativebug + Made By Rae

The first class, Sew Beginner Pants, takes you from start to finish on a basic pair of pants. I love the utility of pants, how simple they are (one pattern piece!), that it is a gender-neutral clothing item, and how quickly they can be sewn. It walks you through setting up your sewing machine for the first time, cutting out the pieces, and sewing them together. The video allows you to sew along and learn all those little tips and tricks you’d learn if you could take one of my classes in person. I also figured out a way to sneak seam finishing into this class because though pants can be sewn lickety-quick, if you want them to last through multiple wears and washings, seam finishing is essential. The class also includes a printable download with two sizes of the Parsley Pant pattern, a newborn size and a toddler size. The larger size is labeled size 3, and I also included a size 2 hemming line (and I’ve got them hemmed up even further for these pics of Hugo, since he’s not quite in a size 2 length-wise). And of course, if you needed more sizes you could use the same instructions for any size of my Parsley Pants pattern. Here’s the class description:

Begin your foray into sewing for little ones with Raes Parsley Pants pattern. Rae shows you how to work with multi-sized patterns and covers tricky techniques like sewing curves and adding an elastic waistband. This pattern is practical and simple, and you will get the satisfaction of seeing an entire garment come together in just a couple of hours. Start building your basic garment construction skills with this class.

Learn How To:

  • Set up your sewing machine
  • Select size and cut out your pattern
  • Sew curved seams
  • Add an elastic waistband and ribbon tag
  • Finish hems

Sewing for little ones set / Creativebug + Made By Rae

The tee was made as a sample for the Trace and Make Knits class, the third and final class in the series. “Trace and Make” means you start with a piece of clothing that fits your child, and you trace it to make a pattern from the garment so you can make even more (sidenote: I do this to make clothes for my kids to wear, but never for a pattern I intend design and sell). In this particular class, I demonstrate how to trace and construct not only a tee but a pair of leggings as well, another essential item for children. The class also includes an introduction to knit fabric and sewing with knits, and shows you how to sew the tee and leggings from start to finish…I mean, for the price of the subscription, I can’t even… Let’s put it this way: all of this content would be a $100 workshop if I offered it locally, you know? Not to mention, the principles of tracing, making, and constructing tees and leggings are exactly the same for kids as they are for men, or women, so I personally think this class has a HUGE value and I’m so glad that I can point folks who are interested in sewing with knits to it! Here’s the class description:

Tracing and making is a great way to learn about clothing construction. In this final part, Rae shows you how to trace a favorite t-shirt and pair of leggings to create your own patterns, which you can use to construct custom garments. You will also learn all about working with knit fabrics—a staple fabric for kids. This class rounds out the wardrobe nicely, teaching you more skills like working with shoulders and sleeves and how to add a double-fold neckline.

Learn How To:
· Work with knit fabrics
· Select a tee and leggings to trace
· Trace tee and leggings for pattern
· Create a pattern on Swedish tracing paper
· Construct a tee-shirt shoulder seam, sleeve seam and double-fold neckline
· Add tags to tee and leggings
· Insert elastic waistband in leggings

Sewing for little ones set / Creativebug + Made By Rae

I have even more to say about the second class (“Sew a Beginner Dress”) yet, but I’ll save that for a later post. I couldn’t be more thrilled with how these classes turned out and I really hope that you will subscribe and watch them if you haven’t already. I’ve known for a long time that I wanted to offer video somehow, to make an extra instructional resource available for people who wanted to try my sewing patterns but maybe needed a little more support (and I’ve done a handful of campy how-to videos for a few of my sewing patterns), but but holy sh*t is it ever hard to film, edit, and publish video on your own. I’m still a little gobsmacked at how adeptly the editors whittled down an entire week’s worth of shooting into these three thorough yet concise classes that can each be watched from start to finish in one sitting (and, Bonus Miracle: manage not to make me look like a total idiot!). I can’t say this without sounding like a total fan-girl, but it was such an honor to have had the opportunity to partner with Creativebug on this thing and I’m proud to be able to put my name on such a high-quality project.

You can sign up for free and take my classes by clicking on this image:

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Note: all Creativebug links in this post are affiliate links, which means I earn a small amount if you subscribe via one of my links.

Feather Washi Dress

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This lightweight feather lawn caught my eye when I taught the Luna class at Dry Goods Design in Seattle last month, so I bought a few yards along with a handful of other lovely fabrics. Keli finds some really amazing apparel fabrics and they often move fast, so it’s always a good idea to pounce when you see something you like. A few days ago I got inspired and turned it into a tea-length Washi Dress with a bow.

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I am so thrilled with how this turned out. I was worried that the fabric might be too busy for a big bow (from the Washi Expansion Pack), but I shortened it so it can hang down without being tied and I love it.

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I’ve been sewing a lot this week at the expense of many other things that need to be done, but being able to fully immerse myself in creative work is restorative. Creating beautiful things is exhilarating for me. It reignites my passion for my work and reminds me to be grateful to be able to do it. Creative work is such a luxury, and such a gift, isn’t it? I am fully aware that as such, it is also temporary.

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The dress is a slightly modified version of View A from the Washi Expansion Pack, with the main changes being length, some width in the front, and a shorter bow. Here’s a quick recipe for this dress!

You will need:
Washi Dress Sewing Pattern
Washi Expansion Pack (“XP”)

Cut the following pieces from the Washi Dress Pattern:
1 Back, extend length of the skirt by 11″
1 Front Skirt, adding 3″ at the fold to add 6″ total to width, extend length of skirt 11″
(see the pattern instructions for how to add length to the dress)

Cut the following pieces from the Washi XP:
2 Bow bodices
2 large bows, subtracting 6″ from length of each
bias strips for armholes (I made mine 1.5″ wide)
1 elastic casing

Follow the instructions for View A from the expansion pack, except gather the front skirt instead of pleating it, as shown in the View B instructions.

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My favorite shoes to wear with Luna Pants

luna pants

The jogger-style pant is a relatively new trend, so when I first started wearing my Luna Pants last summer, I played it safe and just wore them with sandals. Since then, I’ve discovered that Luna looks great with a number of other shoes, so I wanted to share my four favorite kinds of shoes to wear with Luna Pants. Maybe this will give you some new ideas if you’ve been wondering how to wear your new Luna Pants!

Clogs
I think Lunas are adorable with clogs. The heel helps make the leg look longer and increases the distance from the cuff to the ground, which is visually flattering! (these are Dansko clogs, by the way)

luna pants

Sneakers
This is the school-pickup or yoga class look. Bonus: it’s comfortable and sporty!

luna pants

Luna pants with sneakers

Sandals
As I mentioned, Luna looks great with sandals, and the options are nearly endless depending on whether you have dressy, casual, flat or heeled sandals (the heeled sandals shown here are also Danskos).

luna pants

luna with sandals

luna pants

luna with sandals

Flats
Dress them up with a pointed flat, or go with a ballet flat, Toms, or moccassins for everyday wear.

luna pants

luna pants

Finally, here’s a shoe that I tried but I don’t really think works: the high top sneaker (even though I la-la-love these new Supergas!! Just not quite right with Lunas).

luna pants

What do you think? I don’t love it, but if you do, I’d support you 100%.

I think the reason it’s not a win for me is that personally, I think jogger-style pants look best with a bare ankle. This also means that wearing them in winter can be tricky. Jess pulls it off with a pair of adorable ankle boots, but finding the perfect bootie can be a trick. I’ll admit most of the time when the weather’s cold I just go Full Nerd and wear my Lunas with striped socks to fully cover all bare skin, but it’s not the most attractive look. So take advantage of the warmer weather and get out there and wear those fabulous pants!

PS. Have you seen this post on how to wear joggers? Some great tips in that post on wearing Luna-style pants!

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Your Luna Makes!

As the Luna Pantsalong begins to wind down, I wanted to share a bunch of the fantastic photos you have been posting online of your Luna Pants. I love the different fabrics that are chosen and the fun styles represented here!luna pantsalong roundup - made by rae

above left: Kristin / right: ourkookylife

luna pantsalong roundup - made by rae
above left: jesworcestermakes / right: indie_sew

luna pantsalong roundup - made by rae
above left: Robert Kaufman / sewhungryhippie (Who has made and blogged a bunch of great pairs!!)

luna pantsalong roundup - made by rae
above, left: inkandindigo  / right: teridodds1

luna pantsalong roundup - made by rae
above left: joislateagain / right: gogolittlered

luna pantsalong roundup - made by rae
above left: clairejc (with cat! ) / right: laurenddesign

luna pantsalong roundup - made by rae
above, top left: nique_et / right: davenjilly
bottom left: jessamyb / right: teaandkisses

luna pantsalong roundup - made by rae
above, left: Darla (my mother in law, who has been on a huge sewing kick lately, also wearing her first Josephine blouse!) / right: jessamyb

luna pantsalong roundup - made by raeabove: rchlsymns (+adorable bebe)

Finally, I have to show you this adorable photo by Angela of Sew Snippet (see her blog post with more photos here), who also made a pair of matching Moon Pants for her daughter. Isn’t that cute?

Sew Snippet luna pants

Thanks to everyone who shared their wonderful Luna Pants photos, and please keep posting your pics with the tag #lunapantspattern or #lunapantsalong, or just send me a pic!

You can see all of the Luna Pantsalong posts over on the Luna Page.

Have a great weekend, everyone!

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Knit Luna Pants

Tips for sewing Luna in knit

As you may already know, I love sewing with knits (here’s my KNITS page), and I’m always interested in whether knit fabrics will work my patterns. All of my current women’s patterns are designed for woven fabrics, but occasionally I add knits to the suggested fabric list. Originally I wasn’t sure if the Luna Pattern would work in knit fabric, but then Kelli of Cut Cut Sew made one of her test pairs in knit and declared it a win.

knit luna pants

Shortly after that, I found this super-stretchy grey heather knit at a local shop and decided to give it a try. As you can see, it worked quite nicely. They’re shown here with my Nani Iro tee from way back and my newly-painted garage wall.

sewing luna in knit

These have become one of my favorite every day Lunas. I wore them last week to yoga and they were perfect because they stay put when I’m sticking my legs straight up in the air. Woot!!

Luna Pants in knit

Here are a few tips for making a successful pair of Luna Pants with knit fabric, along with some pics of my pair in progress so you can get an idea for what it’s like to make them!

TIPS FOR SEWING LUNA IN KNIT

Consider cutting a size smaller than you would normally wear.
I went down a size and these are still plenty roomy. Keep in mind that you’ll lose a little length both overall and in the rise. I compensated by folding over a smaller cuff elastic casing (1/2″ instead of 1″) at the hems to get back a little length.

sewing luna in knit

Add knit interfacing to the waistband
Knits are easier to work with if you add knit interfacing! My favorite is this tricot interfacing from Fashion Sewing Supply; it’s stretchy and adds stability to make the waistband easier to work with.

sewing luna in knit

Try Wonder Clips instead of pins
Some knits can get small holes from pinning (the sharp ends of the pins can puncture the threads and cause the fabric to unravel). Even if you’re not worried about that, pins can come out of the fabric easily due to the way that knit fabric stretches around when it’s being worked with. Wonder Clips (you can get them at most fabric shops or online) are great for holding everything in place!

sewing luna in knit

Use a serger
I know it’s all the rage to say that you can sew knits without a serger, but these pants are SO MUCH EASIER to sew if you’ve got a serger. The seams will be more flexible, better looking on the inside, and the whole project will go four times faster.

One last thing to mention, though it’s pretty obvious: I added a twill-tape drawstring to this pair (it’s a mod you can find the instructions to in the How to Add a Drawstring to Luna tutorial). The buttonholes were a bit tricky to sew in knit. I’m sure there’s some tip for that I haven’t discovered yet, but I ended up sewing each buttonhole twice to reinforce the stitching. Should have used matching thread…live and learn.

sewing luna in knit

sewing luna in knit

Hopefully these tips will have you well on your way to sewing yourself a fun new pair of knit Luna Pants!

Luna Pants in knit

This post is part of the Luna Pantsalong! Here’s a list of all the previous posts:

Let’s have a Luna Pantsalong!
Luna Pantsalong: Inspiration
Luna Pantsalong: Planning
Luna Pantsalong Day 1: Measure, Print, Tape, and Trace
Luna Pantsalong Day 2: Make a Muslin
Luna Pantsalong Day 3: Cutting
Luna Pantsalong Day 4: Steps 1-4
Luna Pantsalong Day 5: Steps 5-9
How to add a drawstring to Luna Pants
(you can find the Luna Pants sewing pattern here if you need it)

If you’re sewing your own pair of Lunas, please snap a photo of your pants when you’re finished and send it to me, or tag them on Instagram or Facebook or Twitter with #lunapantsalong or #lunapantspattern; it also helps to tag me (@madebyrae) so I’ll see them!

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