Monaluna Flashback with skirt

It’s Friday, friends. And what a week. Let’s talk about something fun, like this cheerful knit top I made for Clementine!

Monaluna Flashback with skirt

I started with my Flashback Skinny Tee pattern in a size 7/8 (how is she so big? WAAAAAH *weeps into coffee cup*), cut off the bodice halfway between the armpit and the hem and added a gathered skirt to the bottom. I made the skirt twice as wide as the bodice and about 11″ tall. Everything else is exactly the same as the original Flashback pattern (cuffs, neckband, fit, etc). I’ve made Flashbacks with skirts before (here and here), but as dresses instead of a top.

Monaluna Flashback with skirt

This awesome fabric is a Monaluna knit in Groovy Lotus and I love how it has a very Scandinavian-esque vibe, kind of like something you would find in Hanna Andersson. I’ve always loved the feel and modern designs of Monaluna fabrics (owner Jennifer Moore is a friend and so lovely), so I almost can’t believe this was the first time I sewed with one of the knits. Verdict? Nice and soft, nice amount of stretch, yet still very easy to work with. Love that it’s 100% organic, too! So nice that I went out and bought a bunch more from her shop last month when she had a knits sale (hint: get on the shop email list!).

Monaluna Flashback with skirt

Monaluna Flashback with skirt

And here is my little goofball illustrating her favorite poses:

 

Monaluna Flashback with skirt

Some serious walk-off fodder here.

Monaluna Flashback with skirt

And…cross-eyed. That’s my little lady.

Monaluna Flashback with skirt

Have a wonderful and relaxing weekend, everyone!

Jess’ Boatneck Washi Maxi Dress + how to

Washi Boatneck

When I posted my boatneck maxi version of the Washi Dress a while ago, I promised to share the version that Jess made last summer that inspired me to make mine. This fabric is “Sinister Swarm” rayon from Anna Maria Horner’s Field Study collection of a few years back.

Washi Boatneck Maxi

I just love this dress! It’s stunning and flowy and it looks fantastic on Jess. I definitely recommend using rayon if you want to try a boatneck maxi version of Washi because it definitely makes the long skirt drape nicely in addition to being super comfortable to wear.

Washi Boatneck

If you want to make your own, here’s a quick how-to!

How to make a Boatneck Washi

You will need:
1 yard of extra fabric if you’re also making a maxi version (optional!)
swedish tracing paper
clear ruler + pencil
Washi Dress Pattern

First you’ll need to trace a new Front Bodice Piece with the following modifications:

1. Extend the center front (fold) line up 4″ at the top, then square the corner at the top. This corner needs to be 90 degrees so that it doesn’t create a peak or a dip when it’s cut on the fold.

2. Mark the midpoint of the shoulder edge. This will be the new neck edge of your pattern piece. From this point, measure out 2 1/4″ along the top of the shoulder and mark. The new shoulder line will now extend a little past the previous shoulder edge of the pattern.

3. Draw a new armhole and neckline. For the armhole, draw a smooth line that eventually meets up with the original armhole close to the sleeve notch marking. For the neckline, connect the new neckline shoulder point with a curve to meet the center front at a 90 degree angle.

In this photo, the green lines are the original pattern piece tracings, with mods shown in pink.

Washi Dress with boat neck

Next, use the new Front Bodice as a template to modify the top part of the Back Dress, making sure to change the neckline and armhole in the same manner as shown above. You want to make sure front and back match!

Now you’re ready to cut out your pieces and assemble your dress using the Washi Dress instructions.

To make the boatneck into a maxi, follow my Washi Maxi Dress Tutorial to lengthen and slightly widen the Front Skirt and Back Dress.

To add a lining, follow the Washi Dress Bodice Lining Videos for instructions on how to use my “sausage” lining method for this. If you wish to line the entire dress, the Maxi Dress tutorial linked above has notes about how to do that (we lined just the bodice for this dress and my Observer maxi dress.)

Even with the added width in the skirt, I’ve found that leaving side slits from just below the knee down to the hem makes walking a lot easier in such a long Washi Dress. Here’s a great tutorial to make side slits.

Washi Boatneck

I know that’s a ton of details to apply to one pattern modification. Honestly it’s almost entirely a new dress pattern, so I’d really only recommend this if you really feel comfortable hacking patterns and you’ve made the Washi Dress before! Please leave a comment or send me an email if you have any questions or need clarification. And as always, I love to see what you’re making with my patterns. The #washidress tag on Instagram is full of awesome versions of Washi!

Washi Boatneck Maxi

Bamboo Shibori Isla

Shibori Isla Top

Look, a new Isla top for me!

Shibori Isla Top

I bought this bamboo shibori from Fancy Tiger Crafts in the summer when we were churning out Islas in the studio. It’s a 95% bamboo rayon / 5% spandex  jersey that is so flowy and comfortable!! Fancy Tiger still has it in stock (this is navy) as well as a lovely gunmetal color (Shop link here. Full disclosure: FTC has been a sponsor of this blog in the past, also: Jaime and Amber are friends). Hart’s Fabric also has something very similar (maybe even the same?) in a few other colors; I ordered a couple yards of the indigo color from them. The faux-shibori thing is pretty hot right now!

Shibori Isla Top

This fabric was a bit more expensive than your average rayon knit, and the quality definitely shows in person. I’m already impressed with how it feels and how little it has pilled up just during wear. Confirming yet again my theory that paying more for knits is worth it.

Shibori Isla Top

And finally, here’s how I’m wearing my Islas as the weather cools off: under a cardigan. The perfect fall combo.

Shibori Isla

Posted in isla
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Sidewalk Flashback Tees

Here’s a little more Sidewalk cuteness for you today! These Flashback Tees are all samples that Jess sewed up for last spring’s Quilt Market. As with the two Isla samples I posted last week, the designs were printed on Spoonflower fabric so we would have samples in time for the show, which means that they are a little different from the final prints. I think the most noticeable difference in color is that the samples have a more citron yellow, while the final prints definitely have a more sunny yellow. The sample fabric also ended up being less stretchy and soft than the Cloud9 interlock, so they worked nicely for photographs even if they won’t end up being worn.

Sidewalk Flashback tee

Hugo is wearing the Flashback Skinny Tee in size 2T in the “Bus Stop” print with “Art Class” collar and cuffs. I knew from the beginning that I wanted to include a bus print in this knit collection for Hugo. He gets excited and yells, “Oh!! BUS!!” whenever he sees buses drive by.

Sidewalk knits

Made by Rae Sidewalk knits for Cloud9 Fabrics (Fall 2016)

This Flashback is made with the “Red Rover” print with cuffs and collar in “Off the Trail,” a print that features cute little snakes. It’s a little crazy with the snakes as contrast, but oh well. Red Rover originated as a print in my Small World corduroy collection, and has been so popular that Cloud9 also released it on cotton laminate this fall (raincoats, anyone?) and now it’s making its reprise on interlock for Sidewalk with black instead of blue as the secondary color. Made by Rae Sidewalk knits for Cloud9 Fabrics (Fall 2016)

The “Bug’s Life” print in white and green makes for a pretty cute little shirt, too! I think this would be perfect for a pair of pajamas!

Flashback Skinny Tee in Sidewalk Knits

Sidewalk is my new line of interlock knits for Cloud9 Fabrics. It will be be shipping to retail shops soon!

Sidewalk Astoria Top

Sidewalk knit Astoria top

Here’s something I whipped up the other day: an Astoria top from Seamwork magazine in the art class print from Sidewalk. I think it works (as do many of the prints in this collection) as a “grown up” print, don’t you? This is probably hard to believe, but I always try to design fabrics meant for women’s apparel, but the collections always end up reading “kid” more than “grown up” once they’re done. I keep trying though. I swear the collection I am working on right now is more serious, just you wait!! Anyway, I love these little pencils so much and it’s really fun to make them into something I can wear.

Sidewalk knit Astoria top

Sidewalk knit Astoria top

I made a size medium of the Astoria pattern and made just a couple of small changes. First, I removed the curve in the side seam which I imagine is meant to accommodate those whose busts achieve the dimensions set forth in the measurement chart for the size medium bust (mine does not). Furthermore, I ended up flipping the entire neckband to the inside of the top and stitching it down after finding that it wasn’t sitting quite as flat as I’d hoped (this is a result I think of using a 100% cotton knit; if you had a lycra knit, you probably wouldn’t have this issue). Overall, it fits quite well considering the cowboy approach I took (no muslin, serger for everything but the sleeve hems and neckline). If I make this again, I might add some length; it’s definitely a cropped top and lands right at my natural waist, so I really can’t raise my arms in this outfit without showing off my midsection. But I think as long as I wear this with high-waisted pants (which unfortunately these awesome red cords are not), it will be fine.

Sidewalk knit Astoria top

I love Seamwork magazine, and this was my first attempt at one of their patterns. I own a few Colette patterns and love the designs that Sarai and her team produce, but the Colette aesthetic has always been a bit fancier than my chase-the-toddler-at-the-park wardrobe demands. So when they launched Seamwork magazine and included a new line of patterns with the subscription (two patterns are free with every issue) that are simpler and a bit more casual than their Colette patterns, it was right up my alley, since as you probably know I tend toward fairly simple garment designs.

Sidewalk knit Astoria top

I still balk a little as a pattern designer at the low price ($6/month for a Seamwork subscription, which means the patterns are all $3 each), because I worry sometimes that stuff like this can make it tougher for my own patterns to sell, but I think that the adage “you get what you pay for” is applicable in many cases. The entire Seamwork magazine is so beautifully presented, the articles are wonderful, and the photographs are amazing, but overall my impression is that the patterns can be hit or miss. Which really is fine with me as a subscriber, since I’m already getting a fantastic magazine with top-notch articles. You can’t expect to get awesome every time when you are getting two new patterns every month for $6. Maybe they do compete on some level with my patterns for the customer who responds to low pricing, but I’ve come to realize that I need to be catering to the person who will value the time and attention I give my patterns, and is happy to pay more for that value. If it takes me six months to make each pattern and then charge next to nothing for them, I really don’t know how I could have a sustainable business. I hope this doesn’t come off as a diss to Seamwork — that’s not how I mean it — but I do think that it’s important to talk about value and quality and how it relates to pricing. Seamwork is just taking a different approach with the subscription model.

Sidewalk knit Astoria top

Anyway, the Astoria top has been, as they’ve put it, one of their “fan favorites,” and I would agree: it’s easy and quick to sew, and doesn’t require much fitting or fussiness. And as you can see, it’s great for showing off Sidewalk!

Sidewalk is my newest fabric collection for Cloud9 fabrics. It is printed on 100% organic knit interlock and will be shipping soon to a fabric shop near you!