My Cleo Skirt Class on Creativebug!

Cleo Skirt on Creativebug / made by rae

Many of you already know that I used to be a science teacher, and that teaching is a real area of passion for me. I have three kids, and in the past few years especially it’s become harder to find time to teach classes locally or travel to teach (though I still definitely do!). Every time I have the opportunity to teach a garment class in person, I have so much fun. So it’s really wonderful to be able to offer classes online through Creativebug; to be able to show you tips and tricks and walk you through the process of making something beautiful for yourself from start to finish, even if I can’t be there with you in person. I really try to imagine what it’s like to make something for the first time, and I hope that comes across in the video lessons. (Also, they have an amazing staff at Creativebug and it was ridiculously fun to fly to San Francisco and work with them).

I’m launching three new women’s sewing classes with Creativebug this spring, and the first one, the Cleo Skirt, is now up and running. Cleo has proven to be a real favorite, and the class includes instruction for both of the views, which have two different pocket options, lengths, and hem options. You can follow this link or click on any of the photos in this post to see the class outline, watch the class preview, and sign up. Creativebug is a subscription-based website, so you get access to all of the classes with your subscription, and you can start with a free trial if you’re not already signed up. Compared with taking a class in person, it’s a real deal!

I even painted my nails gold for this one, guys. You’re welcome.

Cleo Skirt for Creativebug

The pic above shows both views of the skirt, both of which have a combination flat front + elastic back waistband (the one on the left shows the back view). Just in case you’re interested in where I sourced the fabric, the skirt (View B) on the left is Loominous by Anna Maria Horner, and the skirt on the right (View A) is cotton ikat, both of which I purchased online at Stone Mountain and Daughter. Their brick and mortar shop is in Berkeley, right across the bay from San Francisco, and I also went and visited them one day after a video shoot!

By the way, the model in these shots is Ayrika, one of the Creativebug staff. Aren’t these photos gorgeous?? I love how amazing she looks in both of these skirts! As you can see, it’s going to be the perfect garment to take you into spring and summer!!! Get started with your own version of Cleo this weekend!

I hope you enjoy these classes as much as I enjoyed making them for you!

PS. The class includes a PDF version of the Cleo Skirt pattern (slightly modified from the one in my shop), but if you’d prefer to use a printed pattern to use for the class, check if  your favorite sewing shop carries Cleo, or purchase one from one of my online stockists!

Get ready for Cleo on Creativebug!

Cleo Skirt for Creativebug

I’m so excited to let you know that my Cleo Skirt class will be the first one of my garment classes to launch this spring over on Creativebug. I love to teach, and since I can’t actually come to your sewing room in person, this is a fun way for me to show you how to make Cleo virtually! The class will show you how to make both views (shown above) of the skirt.

Cleo goes live on Creativebug this coming Wednesday, March 21. If you you want to sew along when it launches next week, here’s a few things you can do to get ready:

  • Sign up for Creativebug!
  • Get your materials together: the Cleo Page has fabric recommendations, yardage charts, size charts and materials list.
  • If you’d like to have a printed pattern to use for the class, check if  your favorite sewing shop carries Cleo, or purchase one from one of my online stockists!

PS. I’ve got two more garment sewing classes for women coming from Creativebug this spring! The next one is due drop in early May.

How to sew Ruby with a divided yoke

how to sew Ruby with a divided yoke / made by rae

I promised this tutorial last May when I first posted the rose colored Ruby with divided yoke shown below, and since then I’ve had more than one email asking when it would be posted. I guess that makes this a long-awaited tutorial. Sounds pretty special, doesn’t it? I think it is special! It’s a great way to mix up an already super-versatile pattern (Ruby) with a new look.

Rose Ruby with divided yoke

To make Ruby with a divided yoke, you need to line the yoke and assemble the main part of the top in a slightly different order, something I demonstrate in my Ruby with a lined yoke videos, and I’ll refer to the video series for the assembly of the main part of the top rather than walk you through the entire process here. Because of this, it helps if you’ve made a Ruby with a lined yoke, but is not required. Note to beginners: I’d really recommend trying the basic pattern first before attempting either lined mod!

Step 1. Cut Yokes
You’ll need FOUR front yokes, because instead of cutting on the fold, you’ll be adding 1/4” at center front (CF) to accommodate the slit in the front. So take your front yoke pattern piece, add 1/4” at CF, and cut four (so: two sets, one for the lining, one for the outer).

Cut TWO back yokes on the fold, one for the lining and one for the outer

Step 2. Sew yokes together at shoulders
With right sides together, sew each yoke together at the shoulders. Each back yoke will be sewn to two front yokes. Now you have two yokes, one for the lining, and one for the outer.

Step 3. Sew yokes together
Starting and ending 1/2” from the bottom edge of each yoke (it helps to mark this with chalk or fabric marker), sew the yokes together along the neckline and armholes.

Step 4. Turn yoke right side out
Press the armhole and neckline seams, clip them, and then turn the yoke right side out and press again.

Next, fold back the lining along each of the three bottom edges and pin it away from the edge so that it won’t get in the way when you attach the yoke to the main part of the dress/top.

How to sew Ruby with a divided yoke / made by rae

Step 5. Assemble the main dress/top
Sew the front and back of the MAIN dress/top together along the side seams, press and finish the seams. Next, finish the armholes with bias binding attached to the outside and then flipped and stitched to the inside. NOTE: I demonstrate how to do this in this video (skip ahead to 3 min 30 sec to see this).

Finally, gather the top edges of the main dress/top as instructed in steps 3 and 4 of the pattern to prepare to attach it to the yoke.

Step 6. Attach yoke to main dress/top
Pin the back outer yoke to the back main dress/top, matching edges and notches, and pull on the gathering threads until the two are the same size. Distribute gathers evenly and then sew together with a 1/2” seam. Repeat for the front, makin sure that the two front edges are lined up right next to each other. I usually backtack a few times where the two edges meet when sewing this seam.

Clip the seam allowance of the main dress/top at center front right up to — but not through — the seam line (very important!). Press front and back yoke seams towards the yoke.

Step 7. Fold down lining and hand stitch
Fold the lower edge of the lining so that it just covers the yoke seams you just sewed. The trickiest part of this will be at the center front, where the seam allowances need to separate at the notch you clipped. Pin and then stitch by hand in place to finish.

. . . . . . . .

You can see more pics of this Ruby in action over at this post. All of the Ruby tutorials and mods can be found on the Ruby page, and you can buy the Ruby sewing pattern in my shop!

Two more ruffled Gemmas

2 Gemmas with ruffle hems

The ruffled Gemma is clearly now my favorite Gemma Tank mod. I made myself two more with leftover fabric from other projects, and I’m super happy with how well these are going with my cardigans, my favorite winter layering piece, as it’s still quite cold here in Michigan.

Peach Gemma with Ruffle

2 Gemmas with ruffle hems

The first one is a blush tencel rayon twill from IndieSew; the fabric was left over from these Luna Pants. Yes…I see that you Quick Thinkers out there have already realized that I now have the option to wear head-to-toe peach, complete with ruffle in the middle. I am going to resist the urge to do so, for two reasons: 1) that would look ridiculous, as I myself am a light shade of peach and 2) I had a bad faux jumpsuit experience once. Fool me once, as they say…

2 Gemmas with ruffle hems

Second, a ruffled Gemma in a delicious cotton ikat from Stone Mountain and Daughter. I am happy that this one matches just about everything, as it is refreshingly neutral. I could really use a few more neutral wardrobe items to go with all of the colorful stuff I already have, so this one is going to be a great coordinating piece.

Gemma with ruffle hem

2 Gemmas with ruffle hems

If you’ve got the urge to make one of these for yourself, you’re in luck! The How to add a Ruffle to Gemma tutoria will help you make your ruffled Gemma dreams come true.

The Gemma Sewing Pattern is in my shop if you need the pattern:

and be sure to check out the Gemma Page for pattern info and other Gemma-related tutorials.

Liberty Gemma Tank with ruffle

Liberty Gemma Tank with ruffle

Here’s a fun Gemma mod I’ve been wearing for nearly a year but never blogged: a Gemma Tank with a ruffle. You’re in luck if you want to make one of your own because I’m posting a tutorial for how to add a ruffle to Gemma along with this post….simultaneously! Ta-DA!

Liberty Gemma Tank with ruffle

I’ve been hoarding this Liberty Tana Lawn from a trip to Purl Soho in NYC since 2010. I think I purchased this print thinking I would make a dress for Clementine but every time I thought about making her something with it the possibility of it being outright rejected prevented me from even cutting into it. What I’ve now come to understand is that it needed to be worn by someone who would be sure to love and appreciate it. (ME)

Liberty Gemma Tank with ruffle

In the winter (hmmm…actually, most of the year) I wear this one with a cardigan. Sleeveless tops like Gemma and Ruby are perfect for layering under cardigans rather than trying to stuff something with a sleeve into the arms of a sweater.

Liberty Gemma Tank with ruffle

Mirror Selfie from last summer:

Liberty Gemma Tank with ruffle

I’m not sure if it’s even worth mentioning, but I ended up raising the waist seam by about an inch after taking some of these photos. If the waist seam hits me too low on my torso, it makes the overall proportions of a garment look odd.

Here’s a “before:”

Liberty Gemma Tank with ruffle

And here’s the “after” (higher waist seam):
Liberty Gemma Tank with ruffle

Can’t tell the difference? Yeah, I get that. They both look fine, but for whatever reason I got hung up on it. In fact, looking at the photos in this post now I find I prefer the longer ones. TOO LATE! So the moral of this story is: you can make something shorter, but it’s a hell of a lot harder to make it longer.

Liberty Gemma Tank with ruffle

You can check out the tutorial for how to add a ruffle to Gemma for an easy how-to, or buy the Gemma pattern in my shop!

Liberty Gemma Tank with ruffle

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How to add a ruffle to the Gemma Tank

How to add a ruffle to the Gemma Tank

One of my favorite mods for the Gemma Tank has been adding a ruffle to the hem. It’s super easy to do, and it doesn’t even take any extra yardage!
How to add a ruffle to the Gemma Tank

Step 1: Crop the back bodice pattern
You’ll need to shorten the bodice and straighten the hem to add the ruffle. Measure 8″ down the side seam of your bodice pattern piece, beginning at the armhole, and draw a horizontal line perpendicular to Center Back at that spot. Discard the rest of the pattern or fold it up if you want to keep it intact. 8″ is my preferred crop length, but you may want to experiment. Every torso and body is different, and a slightly longer or shorter crop may look better on you!

Step 2. Crop the front bodice pattern
Repeat for the front bodice. VERY IMPORTANT: Remember to skip the dart when measuring along the front side seam!

Now cut out your front and back pieces using your modified pattern.

Step 3. Cut the ruffle pieces
Cut two rectangles out of your fabric for the ruffle. These should be about 10″ tall (again, you may want to experiment with this). The width will depend on your size. I like to use my waist measurement (if you want a nice even number, use the “waist” measurement from the size chart: look under “body measurements” and use the number under “waist” for your size). I like the proportion that this width lends to the ruffle, but if you want a fuller ruffle, you could also use the “hip” number for your size.

Step 4. Assemble the tank
Using the pattern instructions, sew the darts, shoulders, and side seams of the bodice and finish the armholes and neckline with bias binding.

Step 5. Assemble the ruffle
Next, sew the two ruffle rectangles together at the sides with a 1/2″ seam. Then add two lines of gathering stitches along the top of the ruffle, 3/8″ and 5/8″ away from the top edge. I use the longest stitch length and highest tension on my machine for gathering.

Step 6. Attach the ruffle to the tank
With right sides together, pin the ruffle to the tank, matching side seams and pulling on the gathering threads until the top of the ruffle is the same size as the bottom of the bodice. Distribute the ruffles evenly and pin like your life depends on it. No such thing as too many pins here!!! Then sew together with a 1/2″ seam, remove pins, and press seam toward bodice.

Step 7. Hem ruffle
Press under 1/4″ and then 3/4″ along bottom edge of ruffle (or desired amount — I like to try it on and mark the finished length I want before I do this). Press and pin around entire hem, then edgestitch to finish.

Liberty Gemma Tank with ruffle

Voila! Finished ruffle tank!

Liberty Gemma Tank with ruffle

You can see more pics of this Gemma tank in action over at this post. All of the Gemma tutorials and mods can be found on the Gemma page, and you can buy the Gemma sewing pattern in my shop!

Navy striped Flashback tee

Hugo Navy Striped Flashback tee

Time for a Hugo Wardrobe Update! No big surprises here: I made him a new striped Flashback tee in size 3. Though, he is already starting to creep into size 4 territory, esp in pants. Can you believe it?? Waaaaah.

Hugo Navy Striped Flashback tee

I omitted the cuffs and folded the ends of the sleeves under instead (the pattern has a few different sleeve options). Um and I don’t mean to brag but hello check out that underarm stripe matching. Totally unappreciated by the toddler crowd, I’d wager.

Hugo Navy Striped Flashback tee

Also: I made sweatpants with cuffs and waistband from the same striped organic rib knit (I love these striped baby rib knits). He still fits into the green fleece pants I made him last year so now he has two very similar pairs, which is just fine because he has an unusually strong relationship with the color green.

Hugo Navy Striped Flashback tee

Sometimes I think if he and Elliot could have been the same age at the same time I wouldn’t be able to tell them apart except for their haircuts. He’s eerily similar in personality to Elliot at this age, though overall I think Hugo is a bit less high-intensity. Though…yesterday — despite skipping his nap — he ran 50 laps around the kitchen after dinner, giggling. So there’s that. I thought I was due a “quiet” kid with Kid #3 but oh no. It is rarely quiet at our house. All three of my kids are loud. I have no idea where they got that from? *looks around*

Hugo Navy Striped Flashback tee

This tee gave me a chance to try out the Eloflex stretch thread Meg has been raving about and I do have to say I like it a lot more than stretch thread. It’s smooth and very strong and a bit stretchy, but I did have a little problem with my machine tension and a tiny part of the shirt hem stitching has popped already, but I’m pretty sure I know why. So I’m hopeful but not 100% certain that this is the end of my quest for the perfect Coverstitch Machine Alternative (sidenote: Tori just posted about her new coverstitch machine this morning and I’m intrigued).

Hugo flashback tee

This is where I  say something corny like “look how much Hugo loves his new tee!” Too easy?

Hugo Navy Striped Flashback tee

The Flashback Tee sewing pattern is available in my shop in sizes 1-14 years!

Super fun facings trick

super fun facings trick

Facings are a great way to finish a neckline or armhole (bias binding is another way — see my 3 bias binding tutorials here!). I like to have beautiful facings without having to fold up and finish the lower edge, which can produce a visible line from the outside of your garment, and I learned this clever trick a few years ago (probably from Karen) and thought I’d share. It uses your interfacing to finish the facing edge, and it’s just as quick and easy as folding and stitching or overlocking your facings like most patterns instruct. It also looks 100% better, as you’ll see in this tutorial.

Step 1. Cut out your facings and interfacings

The front / back neckline facing pattern pieces I used in this example are from my Beatrix pattern. You can see these facings in use in my How to make Beatrix without buttons tutorial. This tutorial would also work with most armhole, hem, or combined armhole-neckline facings as well.

I’m using fusible lightweight interfacing (this is the kind I like), but this tutorial also works with non-fusible interfacing.

Beatrix facings

Step 2. Sew the seams

Most patterns call for you to baste or fuse the interfacing to the facings before sewing anything. Instead, sew the front and back facings together, and then do the same with the interfacings (so, separately). In this example, I sewed the facings together at the shoulders, and then the interfacings together at the shoulders using the 1/2″ seam allowance called for in the pattern.

f1940224

Press the facing seams apart, but DO NOT PRESS THE INTERFACING SEAM IF YOU ARE USING FUSIBLE INTERFACING. Let’s avoid that sticky glue nightmare on your iron, shall we?

Step 3. Sew the facings to the interfacings along lower edge

Place the facings and interfacings right sides together and pin:

f1759232

Then sew them together along the lower edge with a 1/4″ seam allowance. This should be the edge where you would normally fold up and stitch, or otherwise finish the edge of the facing before attaching it to the garment. It should not be the edge that will attach to the garment.

Beatrix facings - sew together

Step 4. Turn right side out and press

Now go ahead and turn them right side out, using a point turner to push out the bottom edges.

beatrix facings

And then press them together!!! At this point the fusible interfacing will fuse to the facing, and it creates a beautiful finish…see? Here’s the interfacing side:

f1844736

And the facing side:

f1838336

Step 5. Attach to garment

Now the facings are ready to attach to your garment! You can see how I attached these in this post.

Finished facings - Beatrix

Aren’t they beautiful?

This tutorial works great with my Beatrix, Washi, or even Charlie sewing patterns. Have you ever tried this trick?

Geranium XP Fall Tour Round, part 2

We’re wrapping up the GXP Fall Tour today! Over the last couple of weeks, I’ve been totally blown away by the amazing dresses that these talented sewists have made using my Geranium Expansion Pack sewing pattern. Take a look at last week’s roundup, or read on for a gathering of this week’s photos and links!

Made By Sara‘s version has an extended bodice, gathered long sleeves, and the collar. Isn’t this rayon print pretty? I love how classic this dress is!

GXP Fall Tour 2017

GXP Fall Tour 2017

Laurence posted her little Liberty twill GXP on her blog, Blanche. She doubled the width of the skirt, which makes for some delightful twirling!

GXP Fall Tour 2017

GXP Fall Tour 2017

Sylvia of Lily & Woody made hers out of a French Terry. Because of the stretchiness of the knit, she could skip the back closure — no buttons or zipper necessary!

GXP Fall Tour 2017

GXP Fall Tour 2017

Delia Creates made hers out of this large-scale green gingham with a contrasting white collar. I love the collar peeking out of the sweatshirt here. And that socks/boots combo!!

GXP Fall Tour 2017

GXP Fall Tour 2017

Meg at Sew Liberated used some leftovers from her stash to put together this gorgeous raw silk and wool flannel Geranium with a neck bow, long sleeves, and hem band. Rustic and fancy! Meg shared some earlier Geraniums on her blog too; check it out!

GXP Fall Tour

GXP Fall Tour

Summer of SevenPretty made such a sweet GXP with long gathered sleeves, a collar, and an invisible zipper. She has a bunch more photos on her Instagram feed.

GXP Fall Tour

Again with the socks!!

GXP Fall Tour

Ready to get sewing? Buy the pattern: Geranium Expansion Pack (if you don’t have the original Geranium dress pattern, use the drop down menu to pick that up too!).

For more great photos, peruse these tags on Instagram: #geraniumxp#gxpfalltour#geraniumdress

Hope you have a great weekend!