Luna Pantsalong Day 4: Steps 1-4

Now it’s time to sew your Luna Pants! In this post I’m going to cover Steps 1-4 of the Luna Pants sewing instructions. You’ll need your cut pieces (see the last post on cutting for some hints and visual aids) and your copy of the instructions handy to complete this portion of the sewalong.

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Here are the previous Pantsalong posts:

Let’s have a Luna Pantsalong!
Luna Pantsalong: Inspiration
Luna Pantsalong: Planning
Luna Pantsalong Day 1: Measure, Print, Tape, and Trace
Luna Pantsalong Day 2: Make a Muslin
Luna Pantsalong Day 3: Cutting
(you can find the Luna Pants sewing pattern here if you need it)

First, I want to remind you that the seam allowance for this pattern is 1/2″ for all seams (except for the very first step, as noted), and all seams are sewn with right sides together. After sewing each seam, you should press it, and then finish it as desired. You can download and print my free Seam Finishes printable for reference. I’ve also posted about some of my favorite seam finishes in this post.

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Step 1: Attaching the pockets
For this step, each of the four pant pieces needs to have a pocket attached at the side. To do this, pin one pocket to one pant leg at the notches, and sew each pocket on with a 3/8″ seam, one at a time. Note that this is the only time you’ll use a 3/8″ seam in this pattern; you want your pockets attached with a slightly smaller seam allowance than you’ll use to sew the side seams in Step 2.

Hint: After you’ve pinned each pocket to each pant piece, line up the sides to make sure that all of the pockets are the exact same distance from the top of the pants. This will help make sure that all of your pockets will line up nicely when it’s time to sew the pockets together.

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Press the pocket and seam allowances towards the pocket, away from the pant leg (so outward, if you’re thinking of it relative to the body once they’re worn).  For the seam finish here, I like to zig zag the pant/pocket edges together from top to the bottom of the pockets, or use a serger. If you would like, you can also finish the entire side seam edges of the pant pieces at this time; it’s somewhat easier if you finish the edges before you sew the next step.

Hint: If your seam finishes make it hard to see the notches (for instance, my serger trims off the edges), use a piece of chalk to re-mark the notch locations.

Step 2: Sew side seams and pocket seams
For this step, you’ll sew each front pant to its corresponding back pant (VERY IMPORTANT: DO NOT SEW A FRONT TO ANOTHER FRONT) along the side seams, and attach the front and back half of each pocket together. Before you sew, first pin the pieces together, and carefully line up the pocket seams so that they are directly on top of each other. It helps to pin through the pocket seams and then turn it over and check on the other side to make sure they’re lined up.

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Then sew each front and back together along the side seams with a 1/2″ seam, from the top edge of the pants to the first notch and from the bottom notch to the hem of the pants. Since your seam allowance is 1/2″ hear, you’ll notice that this should be 1/8″ inward from the pocket seams you just sewed. Leave a gap between the two notches, and backstitch a few times at each notch. Since your hand will go in the pockets between the two notches, there is a fair amount of stress on this seam, so it helps to backtack, especially at that lower notch.

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Now sew the pockets together along their curved edges (not the flat top part — that will get encased by the waistband facing later). Start from the top edge of the pocket, go around the curve, and stop at the side seam line (don’t go over the side seam stitches!!!).

I like to finish the edge of the pocket and the side seams all at once, by zig-zagging (or serging) from the top corner of the pocket, down the curved edge of the pocket, pivoting when I get to the side seam, and then continuing down the entire side seam to the hem. It’s not necessary to finish the small edge of the side seam above the pocket, since that will be hidden by the waistband later.

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Press the pockets and side seams towards the front of the pants. Pin or baste the pockets in place so their tops are parallel to the top edges of the front pants. This will help prevent you from accidentally sewing the tops of the pockets into the top waistband seam later.

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Now you should have two nice half-pants with a hole where the hand will go for the pockets!

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Step 3: Sew center seams

Place the two pant-halves together, with the two front crotch curves lined up and the two back crotch curves lined up, right sides together.

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Sew the front center seam and the back center seam, just along the curved portions (IMPORTANT: DON’T CONTINUE DOWN THE LEG!)

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Finish the seam as desired. I like to press these seams to one side, use a pinking shears to trim them, and topstitch them down. Another nice option is to press the seam allowance apart and fold under and stitch down (shown below).

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Step 4: Sew Inseams

Before I sew the inseams, I like to do something that will save a little time later: press up the cuff allowance at the bottom of each pant leg. This will make it easier to fold up and stitch the cuffs in Step 7. First fold 1/4″ up and press along the bottom of each pant leg, and then fold up and press another 1 1/4″

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Now pin the pants together along the inseams, starting with center front and back (crotch) seams together, then pinning the bottoms of the pant legs together, and then adding a few more pins along the length of the inseam.

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Sew both inseams downward, starting at the center/crotch and sewing toward the ankle. This is especially important if you’re using a lightweight fabric such as rayon, but no matter what fabric you are using, the direction that you sew the legs together should be consistent; in other words, don’t sew up one leg and down the other. This will help the pants to drape nicely. Another bonus of starting at the center: you can add a little extra stitching to reinforce the crotch, one of the places on a pair of pants that experiences the most Seam Stress.

Once you finish sewing the inseams, press and finish them as desired. You should see already that your pants are coming together nicely!

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

Turn them right-side out, and you’re ready to add the waistband and finish the cuffs!

Luna Pantsalong Day 4

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Are you sewing your own pair of Lunas? Join the Luna Pantsalong! Post a photo of your pants, either in progress or finished, to your blog, Flickr, or social media platform of your choice, and either link back to my blog or use the tag #lunapantsalong! I’d also love to answer any questions or comments in the comments section!

This blog is proudly sponsored by

Luna Pantsalong Day 3: Cutting

Today I want to provide you with a few tips for cutting out your Luna Pants. This post is Day 3 of the Luna Pantsalong. Hopefully you’ve already made a muslin and washed your fabric, so now it’s time to get to the fun part — cutting and sewing!

Luna Pantsalong Day 3: Cutting

Here are the previous Pantsalong posts:

Let’s have a Luna Pantsalong!
Luna Pantsalong: Inspiration
Luna Pantsalong: Planning
Luna Pantsalong Day 1: Measure, Print, Tape, and Trace
Luna Pantsalong Day 2: Make a Muslin
(you can find the Luna Pants sewing pattern here if you need it)

The first thing you should do is fold the fabric in half on your cutting surface, lining up the selvage edges of the fabric as best you can. If you have any wrinkles, press those out with an iron first.

luna pantsalong day 3: cutting

Lay out all pattern pieces before cutting
I recommend that you lay out all of your traced pattern pieces on the fabric to visualize where they will go before you do any cutting. It’s important to line up the grainline arrows on the pattern pieces so they are parallel to the fabric fold/selvages, otherwise the pants may end up draping funny once worn. There’s a suggested cutting layout on page 3 of the pattern to help you figure out where everything will go. Don’t forget that the waistband facings need to be cut at the fold!

Time to cut!
Once you have your pattern pieces arranged the way you want them, pin your pattern pieces to the fabric or use pattern weights to hold them in place. Then carefully cut out your pieces, through both layers of fabric. I like to use a rotary cutter and mat because it goes quickly, but fabric shears are fine too. When you’re finished, you should have:

– 2 back pants
– 2 front pants
– 1 front waistband facing
– 1 back waistband facing
– 4 pockets (2 pairs)

You’ll also need 1″ elastic for the waistband and cuffs, so if you want to cut those out now, go ahead and do that. The chart for the recommended elastic lengths is found on the first page of the pattern.

Luna Pantsalong Day 3: Cutting!

Make sure you have mirror image pairs
The front and back pant pieces and pockets should be mirror image pairs, as shown above, since you cut through two layers at once. If you choose to cut your pieces out one at a time without folding your fabric first, keep this in mind. I actually DO recommend cutting one piece at a time (rather than through two layers) if you’re working with rayon or a super-drapey fabric that is difficult to work with! It gives you much more control over the grain of each piece.

Contrast waistband
A nice way to save fabric or just add a fun touch is to use a different fabric for the waistband and/or the pockets. I did this with the waistband of my Yucca Luna pants, as well as the mini-pair I’m using for the Pantsalong photos (as you can see above) and it adds a fun surprise inside the pants.

When should you add interfacing to the waistband facings?
If you are working with a fabric that isn’t very stable (rayon, linen, loose-weave wovens, knit etc), I’d also recommend cutting and attaching lightweight fusible interfacing to your waistband pieces to help stabilize the waistband a bit. Avoid using a heavy or mid-weight interfacing; a stiff interfacing will make it hard for the waistband to gather, so look for the lightest interfacing you can find!

Just a quick note about time: the cutting usually takes me about a half hour (remember my planning post?), but if this is your first time making the pants, give yourself at least an hour and go slowly!

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Are you sewing your own pair of Lunas? Join the Luna Pantsalong! Post a photo of your pants, either in progress or finished, to your blog, Flickr, or social media platform of your choice, and either link back to my blog or use the tag #lunapantsalong! I’d also love to answer any questions or comments in the comments section!

This blog is proudly sponsored by

How to shorten the Luna Pants Pattern

Hellooo! I’ve got something fun for you today, a quick video to show you how to shorten the Luna Pants pattern.

Luna Pantsalong: How to make the pattern shorter

This is for those of you who might find after making your muslin that the legs are too long or the rise of the pattern is too high for you. I cover adjusting both the legs and the rise in the video, both adjustments that would need to happen if you are petite. Reminder: just because you aren’t petite doesn’t mean it doesn’t apply to you; for example, maybe you’re tall but have a long torso + short legs combo, or maybe you just want a lower (or higher) rise.

or click here to watch the video on YouTube

One thing I didn’t mention in the video is that doing the opposite of these adjustments will make the pattern taller. Seems obvious…but thought I’d mention that just in case.

Let me know if you have any questions!

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Are you sewing your own pair of Lunas? Join the Luna Pantsalong! Post a photo of your pants, either in progress or finished, to your blog, Flickr, or social media platform of your choice, and either link back to my blog or use the tag #lunapantsalong!

Still need the Luna Pants sewing pattern? Find it here!

Here are the previous Pantsalong posts:

Let’s have a Luna Pantsalong!
Luna Pantsalong: Inspiration
Luna Pantsalong: Planning
Luna Pantsalong Day 1: Measure, Print, Tape, and Trace
Luna Pantsalong Day 2: Make a muslin

(you can find the Luna Pants sewing pattern here if you still need it)

Fabric Inspiration & Giveaway: Fiddlehead Artisan Supply

This giveaway is now closed. Thanks for all the comments! The winner will be announced soon.

For today’s fabric inspiration, we asked Abby at Fiddlehead Artisan Supply what she would recommend for Luna Pants. Here are her ideas:

luna inspiration

top left: Textured Cotton in peacock / right: Cotton Silk Radiance in gold
bottom left: Wool Flannel in gray heather / right: Cherries rayon

Now for today’s giveaway! Fiddlehead has set aside 3 yards of Purrfect Hiding Spot rayon by Sarah Watts for Cotton and Steel Fabrics, for one lucky winner! Leave a comment on this blog post by 2pm EDT tomorrow for your chance to win.

luna inspiration

Giveaway details: Entries from the United States only. To be entered in the drawing, leave just ONE comment on this post by 2 PM EDT tomorrow afternoon (Tuesday, April 19, 2016). One (1) winner will be randomly selected and contacted via email to provide a shipping address, and will receive 3 yards of Purrfect Hiding Spot rayon fabric from Fiddlehead Artisan Supply. Void where prohibited by law.

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Are you sewing along with our Luna Pantsalong? All you have to do to participate is show us one or more photo(s) of your Luna pants, either in progress (a pile of fabric! your cut pieces! as you sew a seam!), or finished (on a hanger! on you!), to one or more of the following spots online:

Your blog: Post photos and link back to one of my Pantsalong posts (so I can see it in my trackbacks).

Instagram: Follow @madebyrae, and post photos and use the tag#lunapantsalong.

Facebook: Post photos and use the tag #lunapantsalong, then share your post on my timeline.

Flickr: Post photos in the Luna Pants photo pool.

Still need the Luna Pants sewing pattern? Find it here!

Other posts so far in the Pantsalong:
Let’s have a Luna Pantsalong!
Luna Pants Inspiration
A plan for sewing Luna Pants
Luna Pantsalong Day 1: Measure, Tape, Print, and Trace
Luna Pantsalong Day 2: It’s Muslin Time

This blog is proudly sponsored by

Luna Pantsalong Day 2: It’s Muslin Time

Today I want to talk about making a muslin for the Luna Pants pattern. This makes a great weekend project if you’re joining me as part of the Luna Pantsalong!

LUNA PANTSALONG Day 2

Here are the previous Pantsalong posts:

Let’s have a Luna Pantsalong!
Luna Pantsalong: Inspiration
Luna Pantsalong: Planning
Luna Pantsalong Day 1: Measure, Print, Tape, and Trace
(you can find the Luna Pants sewing pattern here if you still need it)

What is a muslin?

A muslin (or toile) is a test-version of a pattern made of inexpensive fabric. Some people like to use an old vintage sheet, or cheap garage sale cotton, but I personally prefer using plain muslin fabric. I don’t recommend using anything with a great deal of drape or loose weave (even if your first pair will be rayon or double gauze!!), because apparel fabrics tend to be pretty forgiving, and believe it or not, you don’t want the muslin to be forgiving. The point of the muslin is to get the best idea possible of the true fit of the pattern pieces relative to your body, and to help quickly identify areas on the pattern that may need fixing for you, and a stable fabric with very little stretch is a great way to do that.

How to make a muslin for Luna Continue reading