Rose Ruby with Divided Yoke

Rose Ruby with divided yoke

Rose Ruby with divided yoke

I always get a little overwhelmed in spring with all the new things I want to sew; clothes for kids, clothes for me, all the ideas and designs in my head, all the new patterns online getting me inspired. It happened again this year: last month I felt really overwhelmed by work and life, and it wasn’t great, and I can’t say I figured out a great way to deal with it so this isn’t a personal victory story or anything like that. However, I managed to attack a few things on my WIP pile, including a Ruby top with a black lawn yoke and pink voile bottom that I had started just after Hugo was born, tried on, decided that I looked like a cow in it (oh ye post partum body issues, le sigh…), and abandoned. I took off the black yoke, sewed a new divided/lined yoke from the pink main fabric, and hemmed it so it has a cropped length (about a 3″ hem allowance instead of 1″). Can’t believe how much more I love this thing now.

Ruby with divided yoke

Rose Ruby with divided yoke

Rose Ruby with divided yoke

Rose Ruby with divided yoke

The fabric is Pickering Voile from Dry Goods Design, and it’s super sheer and fairly wrinkle resistant. They won’t have it anymore, but if you keep an eye on that shop, I promise you’ll find some gem apparel fabric. The rose pink works well with my white jeans (I got fistbumped by a homeless lady the other day who told me they were — and I quote — “White, tight, and right”) and my decades-old Gap jean jacket. Oh and my new haircut! So easy! So quick to dry!! Looks good with my glasses!!! Haircut for the win.

Rose Ruby with divided yoke

I’ll post a how-to for the divided yoke Ruby soon. Meanwhile you can check out my past Ruby posts and tutorials on the Ruby Page, or just get yourself started with the Ruby pattern from my shop.

Anyway, I hope you’re full of spring sewing mojo! But if you’re suffering from Spring Sewing Idea Paralysis, try taking something off the WIP pile instead. It might work for you too!

How to crop the Gemma tank

How to make a cropped Gemma Tank / made by rae sewing patterns

As promised, and just in time for some fun weekend sewing, here’s a tutorial to show you how to turn your Gemma tank into a cropped tank, as seen in Jess’ fantastically popular Cleo / Gemma outfit in this post. I’ve included an original Gemma tank in the pic above at right so you can see the difference between the original tank and the cropped version. If you need the pattern, you can buy it in my shop.

The best way to figure out how much to crop off the bottom of the pattern is to make an original Gemma (or at the very least, a muslin) first, so you can make sure you have the right size and bust size. Gemma comes with both an A/B and C/D front bodice piece for each of its nine women’s sizes. Once you’re happy you have the right size, you can use your pattern tracings to make new modified pattern pieces (Not sure how to trace a pattern? Check out this great tutorial where we show you how to trace a pattern!) . Try your Gemma on and determine how long you would like the cropped version to be.

You will need:

  • The Gemma tank sewing pattern, traced in your size
  • Straight edge and pencil (clear quilter’s ruler is helpful)
  • Additional Swedish tracing paper (see this post for sourcing STP)

How to crop the Gemma pattern

Step 1. Decide how long you want your cropped version to be
Try your Gemma (or Gemma muslin) on and determine how long you would like the cropped version to be. Measure down the side seam from the armpit to where you’d like your cropped hem to land. You may find it helpful to fold under the hem of your Gemma to visualize what it would look like cropped, mark this distance at the side seam with chalk, and then measure the distance.

Step 2. Draw the new hemline on your pattern
Measure this distance from the armpit along the side seam of the BACK BODICE pattern piece and make a mark. Then use your straight edge to draw a line perpendicular to the fold line (“finished hem,” shown in red). We measured down 7 1/2″ inches from the armpit for this version. This is quite short, so you may want to start with 8-1o inches instead just to be on the safe side, especially if you have a long torso. Remember that you can always trim it shorter, but you can’t add length once you’ve cut it.

Step 3. Add a hem allowance
Draw a cutting line parallel to the finished hem and label it “cut here.” The distance between your two lines will be your hem allowance. In this case, I added 2 1/2″ so that I could fold the bottom edge up 1/2″ first, and then another 2″ for a nice wide hem. A wider hem allowance also gives you a little more flexibility to try it on and get the length just right!  This will be where you cut your fabric when cutting your cropped tank (see tank in photo, left).

Step 4. Straighten the side seam along the hem allowance
Draw a vertical line between your two horizontal lines at the side seam. Cutting your fabric along this line will straighten the side seam and make it easier to fold up the hem allowance when you’re hemming the tank. Bonus points if you can get your line to mirror the angle above the hemline.

How to make a cropped Gemma

Note that both of your horizontal lines should hit the center of the pattern at 90 degrees; it helps to use a clear quilter’s ruler when drawing them to insure that this is the case.

How to make a cropped Gemma

Step 5. Transfer hem and cutting lines to front bodice
Now put your front and back bodice together, matching them up at the bottom and sides (not at the top! the front bodice has a dart that adds extra length to the side seam above the lines you drew), and transfer your lines to the front bodice just as you did for the back bodice.

How to make a cropped Gemma

And again, make sure they intersect center front at a 90 degree angle:

How to make a cropped Gemma

Step 6. Cut out your tank 
Now you’re ready to use your pattern pieces to cut out a front and a back from your fabric as shown in the instructions. I find it works well the first time to fold under the pattern piece at the “cut here” lines to try them out. Once you are happy that you’ve gotten the right cropped length, make a new tracing of the pattern with crop lines so that you can use that one for your cropped versions moving forward.

Step 7. Sew it together
You’ll sew the tank together as instructed in the pattern, but note that to hem this version of Gemma, you’ll fold and press 1/2″ and then another 2″ (or whatever hem allowance you chose) toward the wrong side along the bottom of the tank, and then stitch along the first fold.

I can’t wait to see your cropped Gemma tanks! Please use the #gemmatank and #raemademedoit tags on social media to share your creations. Happy sewing, everyone!

Bird’s Eye View Gemma + Cleo

Bird's Eye View Gemma + Cleo

I’ve always thought the Cleo skirt would look awesome in a border print, so when Jess and I first laid eyes on the “Viewfinder” print from Sarah Watson’s recent collection, Bird’s Eye View for Cloud9 Fabrics, we knew it would be perfect for Cleo. We asked Cloud 9 for a couple of yards which they graciously sent over (thank you, Cloud 9!) and Jess sewed up this awesome cropped Gemma and Cleo skirt combo for herself. My jaw dropped to the floor when I saw these together. It’s just perfect, so chic, and I love the way that Jess cut these so that the Gemma has the larger-scale portion of the print, and the Cleo has the smaller-scale portion with the cactus.

Bird's Eye View Gemma + Cleo

Jess looks ridiculously adorable in this outfit. I’m pretty jealous, not gonna lie.

Bird's Eye View Gemma + Cleo

Bird's Eye View Gemma + Cleo

Bird's Eye View Gemma + Cleo

Sewing details

  • Both skirt and top were cut on the cross grain (that is, the pattern pieces were laid out on the fabric such that the grainline arrows were perpendicular to the selvage rather than parallel as is standard).
  • The solid orange waistband and back detail are made from Cloud9’s Cirrus Solids in the colorway Clementine
  • The armhole and neckline binding was applied using the french method (I wrote a tutorial for that method) without seam allowance added, resulting in a narrower shoulder.

Bird's Eye view Cleo + Gemma

We’ll post a quick how-to showing how to make a cropped Gemma soon — it’s a super fun and easy mod that I think you’ll love!

Posted in Cleo, gemma
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Lace Easter Dress

Lace Easter Dress

It’s not unusual for me to get really excited about sewing something, do most of the work, hit a hurdle of some sort, and then quit the project altogether. That almost happened with this dress which I started at the end of last summer. I started with my Gemma pattern, which I lengthened and cut in two layers (lace and white jersey knit) and managed to sew together at the neckline, armholes, and side seams. Then I decided it needed a waistband and that’s where the project stalled.

Lace Easter Dress

Fast forward to a couple weeks ago, when I picked it up again, added the waistband — when you have two layers this is as simple as sewing two lines of stitches and threading elastic between them — and hemmed it. I make that sound quicker than it actually was; it took me a few tries to get the waistband location right, but now I have a lovely dress for spring! Whyeeeeee did I wait so long to finish it?!? Sometimes I scratch my head at my own self. But at least it’s finished, and damn if it felt good to cross this project off the WIP list.

Lace Easter Dress

I find most of my lace here in Michigan at Field’s fabrics, which is a West Michigan chain that carries both quilting and apparel fabric. I think I bought at least three other laces, so look for more handmade lace clothing in my future.

Lace Easter Dress