Beatrix with invisible zipper

Array

Array

Here’s another Beatrix hack, this one much better than the last (oh wait, you forgot about that post already? Me too.). Reasons why it is better: First, voile. Much easier to sew with. Second, the print looks like someone took a brush and painted directly on it (it is from the Palos Verdes collection by A Creative Mint for Cloud9, the company I also design for); I also bought the triangle print from the same collection because I love that hand-painted look so much. Brilliant. Third: much better fit.

Array

SASSY HANDS! Sorry, this pic was too corny not to include.

Array

The hem on this version is 1″ longer than the actual pattern, making it read more “tunic” than “top” when combined with the fact that this size (L) is now also a bit too big for me. I’m now more of a medium, thanks to the slow meltaway of poundage that accompanies toddler-chasing and starvation due to the fact that he won’t sit at the table for more than five minutes at a time.

Array

I added a lining to this top because voile tends to be somewhat sheer especially in lighter prints. While I was at it, I decided I might add an invisible zip instead of the buttons in the back, which turned out to be completely pointless since Beatrix is a pullover style top and doesn’t require a closure of any kind (and that includes buttons, which seems to confuse some people, since the pattern has a button placket is in back, but I assure you that it really isn’t necessary to unbutton it to get it on or off; it’s really just for show). And even though the zipper ended up being unnecessary, it’s never bad for me to get more practice adding an invisible zip. I designed all of my patterns without zippers because I’m not that skilled at putting them in (as evidenced by this close-up pic of the zipper installation). It’s a vicious cycle I tell you.

Array

Lining a top is not as complicated as it sounds; you make a second garment out of a lining fabric (I used a solid white lawn), and then figure out how best to attach it. I attached the lining at the neckline first, added the zip ala Colette’s invisible zip tutorial, folded the ends of the sleeves up over the lining inside to hem the sleeves (closeup pic here), and left the hem unattached (closeup pic here).

Array

So there you go: another Beatrix for my spring wardrobe!

11 thoughts on “Beatrix with invisible zipper

  1. Just so I get ya; does the lining have bust darts? Also wanted to let you know I love you patterns !!

  2. Would it be possible to add length and make a little dress out of this? I am only 4 feet 11 so I don’t need much fabric.

    • Hi Annick! Yes, it would definitely be possible! You’d just have to make sure you’re leaving enough room for your hips when you extend it, which may mean widening it as you extend the hem a bit (depending on your hips, of course; some people wouldn’t need to do this)! There’s a pic of someone who made a dress version of Beatrix in the pool (at the bottom of this page) if you want to scroll around and look!

    • Hello Annick, I made the Beatrix into a dress/tunic by using the length and width of a dress pattern that I knew fit me-the Pearl shift- and using it as my guide for how much to lengthen it. You can see it on my blog. Nursebeansews.wordpress.com The post is called: The Beatrix Blouse as A Tunic. I am tall and I was able to make a short sleeved version with 2 yards of fabric. I made a contrasting button placket. Good luck!

  3. love it! I’ve been trying to decide what to sew for my spring wardrobe…I’m in desperate need of some new things. I’m sure another ruby or two and who knows maybe I’ll finally make the josephine that I bought the pattern for over a year ago and still haven’t sewn!

Comments are closed.