Josephine with Tassel Ties

Josephine Top with Tassel Ties

Josephine Top with Tassel Ties

How long have you been reading this blog? Long enough to remember how much I love a good bit of pattern improv? Maybe you love it too! The desire to mix it up (constantly) is really what drives me to create patterns that are not only distinct, but work well as blank templates. I just love a pattern I can make over and over again yet never end up with the same thing twice. At first glance the Josephine Sewing Pattern might not seem like a great blank template, being limited in some ways by the pleating detail on the front which lends it a very distinct look and feel, but as soon as you lose the tucks on the front it turns into an entirely different animal.

Josephine Top with Tassel Ties

Josephine Top with Tassel Ties

For this blouse, I dropped the hemline in the center to create a shirt-tail hem, like Beatrix or Gemma, extended the bias binding to create ties and added tassels, and gathered the neckline instead of pleating the bodice. The result is a silhouette with more ease (3″ more, in fact) than the original pattern and an overall look that’s quite on-trend, especially in this dreamy Loominous fabric designed by Anna Maria Horner.

Josephine Top with Tassel Ties

Josephine Top with Tassel Ties

Here’s how to modify the Josephine Pattern to get this version!

How-to: Josephine with Tassel Ties

  • Cut out the A/B bodice using the View C cutting lines (unless you are extremely busty you won’t need the C/D bodice. Skipping the tucks creates additional ease, so even if you’re pretty large-busted, there will be enough ease in the pattern that you won’t need the larger cup size. Check the finished measurement chart and then add 3″ to the FM for bust if you’re not sure!).
  • Drop the center of the hem a few inches when cutting out the pattern to create a shirt-tail shape. Draw an S shape with chalk before cutting, remembering that the hem line needs to intersect center front and sides at a right angle.
  • Gather the neckline edge along the pleated areas with elastic thread (see my shirring tutorial) or with basting stitches. I also gathered a couple inches in the back as well. See photo below:

Josephine Top with Tassel Ties

  • Follow the instructions for View C, but add the sleeves as if you were making View B. I also used elastic thread to gather the sleeve caps and ends of the sleeves…it’s just SO. QUICK. !!!

Josephine Top with Tassel Ties

Josephine Top with Tassel Ties

  • After sewing the center seam, press and fold under, then stitch down the edges of the center front extension, since the edges won’t get enclosed by the tucks like they usually are.
  • When binding the neckline, extend the bias binding past the center front edges to create ties, then stitch it shut and add a couple tassels to the ends (I like Liesl’s tassel tutorial over at Creativebug. I used DMC embroidery floss for these)

And that’s it! Wear and enjoy!

Josephine Top with Tassel Ties

Please let me know if you try this version of Josephine. I’d love to see how yours turns out!

For even more Josephine variations, check out the Josephine page. You might also like this version with with release tucks, or this one with release tucks and sleeves!

18 thoughts on “Josephine with Tassel Ties

  1. Great top. I finally made my Isla top. Nothing to be afraid of. LOL Now I think I’m ready to try the Washi dress.

  2. Seriously. . . The tucks were the only reason I hadn’t bought Josephine, because I try not to draw attention “there”…. so thank you for this tute, I will be giving it a go. 😉

  3. Rae how many yards of the fabric did this version need? Did you need extra to line up the stripes the way you did? I am seriously considering making this in the pink version of this fabric. I might also make this in white double gauze. It would be a great basic. I love the shape of the neckline. Just perfect.

    Also on another note, it would be wonderful if you could someday (in your spare time, ha!) create a basic T pattern with a nice scoop neck like your Nani Iro T from a while back as a follow up knit pattern to the Isla. I can’t find anything quite like it. Most of the T patterns out there are more boxy and the necklines are not as pretty. You really do such a beautiful job with necklines my friend. It is one of your superpowers.

    • Hey Julie!
      The yardage for View B will be fine; I made a size M with 2 yards (the chart says 2.5 yards) and I had to get really creative with my layout, so I would recommend the chart yardage just to be on the safe side!!

      Will take your tee request into consideration. 🙂

Comments are closed.